jacey: (Default)
Here's the last part of the mistle thrush story, but it's not a happy ending, I'm afraid.

Three very beaky and healthy chicks in the nest on 21st June.
At this point I guess they were each the size of a small sparrow and very perky.06175beakychicks
And Mum was hopping back and forth feeding them, with dad hovering nearby most of the time - and taking his turn
06181Mum&chicks

And then the rain set in so mum hunkered down over the nest and fluffed herself out to cover it.
13082sitting 23rd

But yesterday afternoon BB found a chick in the middle of the lawn. No idea how it got there. It may have fallen or been pushed out of the nest and had enough life in it to get that far, or it may have been snatched by a predator and dropped. My money's on the former, since there didn't seem to be any blood.

And then there were two.
13092twochicks

Mum was sitting tight yesterday afternoon.
13090Mum

But around six p.m. something was definitely upsetting both parent birds. They were agitated and flying round. A couple of times they tried to divebomb the living room window (below the nest) as we looked out. I checked the nest around six this morning and mum was sitting happily, but when I got up at nine she was off the nest and the chicks were horribly still. I've always been able to see them moving before, not just fluttering but breathing, but this time there was no sign of  life. There was a thrush in the garden and I could see the shadow of one on the roof ridge, but they weren't coming close. I checked again ten minutes later and the chicks were in exactly the same position.

Dead. 25th June 2013.
Dead-25th June

I don't know what killed them. maybe it was the unseasonal cold, wet and windy weather that chilled them while Mum was away foraging. Perhaps with only two chicks in the nest they couldn't maintain warmth for very long. I've really no idea, but sad as it is that's the way nature works.

I'm sorry the clutch failed. The way things were going on I figured she'd end up with one chick, but I didn't expect her to lose all of them. As you can see they were just beginning to get a few feathers, but they were still very vulnerable.
By ten this morning there was no sign of thrushes in the garden at all. BB says he'll give it until tomorrow and then get out the ladder and remove the nest and the dead chicks from the windowsill.

Mistle thrush chicks RIP
jacey: (Default)
Here's the last part of the mistle thrush story, but it's not a happy ending, I'm afraid.

Three very beaky and healthy chicks in the nest on 21st June.
At this point I guess they were each the size of a small sparrow and very perky.06175beakychicks
And Mum was hopping back and forth feeding them, with dad hovering nearby most of the time - and taking his turn
06181Mum&chicks

And then the rain set in so mum hunkered down over the nest and fluffed herself out to cover it.
13082sitting 23rd

But yesterday afternoon BB found a chick in the middle of the lawn. No idea how it got there. It may have fallen or been pushed out of the nest and had enough life in it to get that far, or it may have been snatched by a predator and dropped. My money's on the former, since there didn't seem to be any blood.

And then there were two.
13092twochicks

Mum was sitting tight yesterday afternoon.
13090Mum

But around six p.m. something was definitely upsetting both parent birds. They were agitated and flying round. A couple of times they tried to divebomb the living room window (below the nest) as we looked out. I checked the nest around six this morning and mum was sitting happily, but when I got up at nine she was off the nest and the chicks were horribly still. I've always been able to see them moving before, not just fluttering but breathing, but this time there was no sign of  life. There was a thrush in the garden and I could see the shadow of one on the roof ridge, but they weren't coming close. I checked again ten minutes later and the chicks were in exactly the same position.

Dead. 25th June 2013.
Dead-25th June

I don't know what killed them. maybe it was the unseasonal cold, wet and windy weather that chilled them while Mum was away foraging. Perhaps with only two chicks in the nest they couldn't maintain warmth for very long. I've really no idea, but sad as it is that's the way nature works.

I'm sorry the clutch failed. The way things were going on I figured she'd end up with one chick, but I didn't expect her to lose all of them. As you can see they were just beginning to get a few feathers, but they were still very vulnerable.
By ten this morning there was no sign of thrushes in the garden at all. BB says he'll give it until tomorrow and then get out the ladder and remove the nest and the dead chicks from the windowsill.

Mistle thrush chicks RIP
jacey: (Default)
Five eggsSo Mrs Mistle Thrush laid one egg per day from Monday to Friday. You've seen the other pics - this is the full nest.












And on the sixth day she rested...













ChicksThen last Friday... four chicks (count the beaks). I wondered whether the chicks hatched a day apart since the eggs were laid a day apart, but it seems that four is all there is. Anyone know what happened to the other egg? Does it get eaten if it doen't hatch? There's no sign of it having been tossed out of the nest.









Mum and Dad Mistle ThrushSo now both Mum and Dad are on feeding duty













OThree chicksnly four days and already the chicks are much bigger, but now there are only three in the nest. Is this Darwin in action? When Mum comes back with grub they are already leaping up to compete for it, their yellow beaks open as wide as their head and red throats offering an excellent target for either Mum or Dad with a spare worm. Eating machines.

jacey: (Default)
Five eggsSo Mrs Mistle Thrush laid one egg per day from Monday to Friday. You've seen the other pics - this is the full nest.












And on the sixth day she rested...













ChicksThen last Friday... four chicks (count the beaks). I wondered whether the chicks hatched a day apart since the eggs were laid a day apart, but it seems that four is all there is. Anyone know what happened to the other egg? Does it get eaten if it doen't hatch? There's no sign of it having been tossed out of the nest.









Mum and Dad Mistle ThrushSo now both Mum and Dad are on feeding duty













OThree chicksnly four days and already the chicks are much bigger, but now there are only three in the nest. Is this Darwin in action? When Mum comes back with grub they are already leaping up to compete for it, their yellow beaks open as wide as their head and red throats offering an excellent target for either Mum or Dad with a spare worm. Eating machines.

jacey: (Default)
Mrs Mistle Thrush has been sitting tight on a clutch of five eggs laid one per day from Monday to Friday over the week of 29th May. The last time she was off the nest was Thursday 14th and when I peeped the eggs were all there. On Friday 15th June there were four tiny, mostly bald chicks in the nest. I don't know whether they hatch together or in relays. There may still be an egg buried under the chicks, or I may have miscounted chicks as they were tiny and all dogpiled together, little scrawny things with huge beaks. I didn't manage to get a photo of the chicks as Mrs M-T was only away from the nest for a few moments, but I have my camera close to the window and will snap one if I can.

More later.
jacey: (Default)
Mrs Mistle Thrush has been sitting tight on a clutch of five eggs laid one per day from Monday to Friday over the week of 29th May. The last time she was off the nest was Thursday 14th and when I peeped the eggs were all there. On Friday 15th June there were four tiny, mostly bald chicks in the nest. I don't know whether they hatch together or in relays. There may still be an egg buried under the chicks, or I may have miscounted chicks as they were tiny and all dogpiled together, little scrawny things with huge beaks. I didn't manage to get a photo of the chicks as Mrs M-T was only away from the nest for a few moments, but I have my camera close to the window and will snap one if I can.

More later.
jacey: (Default)
Ladybeak is now hunkered down on four eggs in the nest - that one each day from Monday to Thursday this week.

Four eggs - Mistle Thrush nestHunkered down on the nest
jacey: (Default)
Ladybeak is now hunkered down on four eggs in the nest - that one each day from Monday to Thursday this week.

Four eggs - Mistle Thrush nestHunkered down on the nest
jacey: (Default)
First egg appeared in the nest sometime early evening Monday. By Tuesday mid-dayish there were two and today there are three. Ladybeak was hunkered down on the nest earlier today but she'd obviously popped out for dinner this evening and we could get right up to the open window and snap the nest from above.
Three eggs - mistle thrush nest
jacey: (Default)
First egg appeared in the nest sometime early evening Monday. By Tuesday mid-dayish there were two and today there are three. Ladybeak was hunkered down on the nest earlier today but she'd obviously popped out for dinner this evening and we could get right up to the open window and snap the nest from above.
Three eggs - mistle thrush nest
jacey: (Default)
The nest on the windowsill overlooking the yard is now abandoned and since there was no mangled Baby Beak on the concrete I presume he took off and flew like a champion. The neighbour who owns the windowsill has removed the nest already, probably to take it down to school because they are doing a project on birds. I gave her some of my photos and hope to get some of the ones she took from above the nest.

Ladybeak 1 28-6-12In the meantime the new pair of mistle thrushes have completed their nest on our bedroom windowsill and this lunchtime Ladybeak was sitting on it like a champion. It appears she's just practising  because at 4 p.m. when I went up there she was away and the nest was empty.

We've got a grandstand view through the window though the glass is a bit mucky from the nest-buiding activity so there are a few spatters and blotches on the photos.

I took these on the zoom but I was literally about three feet away from her on the other side of the window glass. I moved in slowly and unlike yesterday when she spotted me and flew off, this time she sat tight. I'm going to keep popping upstairs to see if there's any change and see what difference different light conditions make. That window is in full sun for most of the day so there are reflections, but first thing in the morning it's in shade.
Ladybeak2 28-5-12
jacey: (Default)
The nest on the windowsill overlooking the yard is now abandoned and since there was no mangled Baby Beak on the concrete I presume he took off and flew like a champion. The neighbour who owns the windowsill has removed the nest already, probably to take it down to school because they are doing a project on birds. I gave her some of my photos and hope to get some of the ones she took from above the nest.

Ladybeak 1 28-6-12In the meantime the new pair of mistle thrushes have completed their nest on our bedroom windowsill and this lunchtime Ladybeak was sitting on it like a champion. It appears she's just practising  because at 4 p.m. when I went up there she was away and the nest was empty.

We've got a grandstand view through the window though the glass is a bit mucky from the nest-buiding activity so there are a few spatters and blotches on the photos.

I took these on the zoom but I was literally about three feet away from her on the other side of the window glass. I moved in slowly and unlike yesterday when she spotted me and flew off, this time she sat tight. I'm going to keep popping upstairs to see if there's any change and see what difference different light conditions make. That window is in full sun for most of the day so there are reflections, but first thing in the morning it's in shade.
Ladybeak2 28-5-12
jacey: (Default)
So while Mr & Mrs Mistle Thrush raise Baby Beak on the neighbour's windowsill overlooking our back yard, there's another pair building a nest on our bedroom windowsill. We get a close up view through the window, so I even cleaned the glass while she was out collecting nest stuffing. Expect more photos.

Now is the time I wish I'd not downgraded from SLR when I went digital - or that I'd invested in a camera with a better lens, but My Samsung P1200 will have to do.
jacey: (Default)
So while Mr & Mrs Mistle Thrush raise Baby Beak on the neighbour's windowsill overlooking our back yard, there's another pair building a nest on our bedroom windowsill. We get a close up view through the window, so I even cleaned the glass while she was out collecting nest stuffing. Expect more photos.

Now is the time I wish I'd not downgraded from SLR when I went digital - or that I'd invested in a camera with a better lens, but My Samsung P1200 will have to do.
jacey: (Default)
Beaky on WednesdayI can't believe how much Beaky has grown in just a few days. The thrushes are thriving. Mum and Dad are still foraging and Baby Beak is getting huge.

Left is Mum and Baby Beak on Wednesday evening.










Baby BeakAnd by this evening (Friday) he'd grown into this little bruiser (right)














Both Mum and Dad are taking it in turns to feed the chick. One arrives and the other flies off almost instantly as if the baton had been passed. Getting a photo of them all together is rare. Mum and Dad Mistle-Thrush and Baby Beak hiding behind Mum

(Left)
Mum and Dad Mistle-Thrush and Baby Beak hiding behind Mum


jacey: (Default)
Beaky on WednesdayI can't believe how much Beaky has grown in just a few days. The thrushes are thriving. Mum and Dad are still foraging and Baby Beak is getting huge.

Left is Mum and Baby Beak on Wednesday evening.










Baby BeakAnd by this evening (Friday) he'd grown into this little bruiser (right)














Both Mum and Dad are taking it in turns to feed the chick. One arrives and the other flies off almost instantly as if the baton had been passed. Getting a photo of them all together is rare. Mum and Dad Mistle-Thrush and Baby Beak hiding behind Mum

(Left)
Mum and Dad Mistle-Thrush and Baby Beak hiding behind Mum


jacey: (Default)
Mrs Mistle Thrush has been faithfully sitting on her nest on the neighbour's windowsill - a barn conversion which overlooks our yard - for the past few weeks while Dad has stood sentinel on the ridge of our barn. Photos would only have shown a pile of twigs with a tail sticking up out of it. But today I noticed she was standing on the rim of the nest and there was little Baby Beak bobbing up and down. There seems to be only one chick. I'm not sure when he was hatched - but it can't have been more than 5 days ago as she was still sitting when we had a load of visitors who took some photos of the nest. He seems big for a hatchling. At one point he fluttered about and stretched his embryonic wings before settling back in the nest.

Anyhow my camera doesn't have a very good zoom as you can see from the lack of detail on this, but I did manage to get some pics today from inside the porch through glass.

The sparkly background is the frosted glass of the window.

jacey: (Default)
Mrs Mistle Thrush has been faithfully sitting on her nest on the neighbour's windowsill - a barn conversion which overlooks our yard - for the past few weeks while Dad has stood sentinel on the ridge of our barn. Photos would only have shown a pile of twigs with a tail sticking up out of it. But today I noticed she was standing on the rim of the nest and there was little Baby Beak bobbing up and down. There seems to be only one chick. I'm not sure when he was hatched - but it can't have been more than 5 days ago as she was still sitting when we had a load of visitors who took some photos of the nest. He seems big for a hatchling. At one point he fluttered about and stretched his embryonic wings before settling back in the nest.

Anyhow my camera doesn't have a very good zoom as you can see from the lack of detail on this, but I did manage to get some pics today from inside the porch through glass.

The sparkly background is the frosted glass of the window.

jacey: (Default)
A thrush has built a nest on the windowledge of our neighbour's house which overlooks our yard. (It's a barn conversion.) Since it's a frosted glass window (non opening) they probably haven't even noticed. Mrs Thrush is sitting on the nest and Mr Thrush is spending a lot of time on the ridge of our barn, keeping watch.

Since it's nesting on a windowledge I'm presuming it should be a mistle thrush but when I listen to the mp3s of British birds oin the web it sounds more like a song thrush. Anyone know how to tell the difference?
jacey: (Default)
A thrush has built a nest on the windowledge of our neighbour's house which overlooks our yard. (It's a barn conversion.) Since it's a frosted glass window (non opening) they probably haven't even noticed. Mrs Thrush is sitting on the nest and Mr Thrush is spending a lot of time on the ridge of our barn, keeping watch.

Since it's nesting on a windowledge I'm presuming it should be a mistle thrush but when I listen to the mp3s of British birds oin the web it sounds more like a song thrush. Anyone know how to tell the difference?
jacey: (Default)
I was woken up the other morning by a strange unrhythmical tapping. When I went to the bedroom window I spotted a small, rotund bluetit outside on the stone sill, pecking away at (I presume) insects on the mastic round the edge of the UPVC - or maybe on the UPVC itself.

And last week a strange fluttering sound in the living room proved to be a young starling that had fallen down the chimney and was flapping round in the ashes under the grate, trapped by the ash pan. It kept pushing its beak through the crack. So I opened the French windows, closed the internal door and pulled out the ash pan. The bird fluttered on to the inside of the fireguard and then spotted the opening and flew away - apparently none the worse for its adventure.

The old sash windows (painted solid) hadn't been opened for years when we moved into thew house in 1980. Catching a starling that's trying to flap its way through a window pane is a neat trick. Luckily they get so focused on what's on the other side of the glass that they completely fail to see the hulking great human creeping up behind them. You can usually get your hands round the body - or if desperate, can lower a lighweight teatowel over it, walk it through the house and let it out of the back door.
jacey: (Default)
I was woken up the other morning by a strange unrhythmical tapping. When I went to the bedroom window I spotted a small, rotund bluetit outside on the stone sill, pecking away at (I presume) insects on the mastic round the edge of the UPVC - or maybe on the UPVC itself.

And last week a strange fluttering sound in the living room proved to be a young starling that had fallen down the chimney and was flapping round in the ashes under the grate, trapped by the ash pan. It kept pushing its beak through the crack. So I opened the French windows, closed the internal door and pulled out the ash pan. The bird fluttered on to the inside of the fireguard and then spotted the opening and flew away - apparently none the worse for its adventure.

The old sash windows (painted solid) hadn't been opened for years when we moved into thew house in 1980. Catching a starling that's trying to flap its way through a window pane is a neat trick. Luckily they get so focused on what's on the other side of the glass that they completely fail to see the hulking great human creeping up behind them. You can usually get your hands round the body - or if desperate, can lower a lighweight teatowel over it, walk it through the house and let it out of the back door.

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