jacey: (blue eyes)
I don't often admit this, but many many years ago when we were broke and contemplating me giving up work to have a family (so potentially becoming even more broke) I tried selling Tupperware on a (then) newfangled party plan scheme. I probably did it for about a year and it was an eye-opener - a window into another world of Americanised sales pitches, cheap gift incentives and coporate hoo-rah. Anyhow, for various reasons I gave it up, but it left me with a lot of Tupperware (yes, you had to buy your samples). But, see, here's the thing, I've used the stuff over the years, well, most of it anyway, and that stuff with a ten year guarantee has lasted (so far) 34 years and it still works. it hasn't cracked or warped, so proof of the pudding and all that...

A couple of years ago my little sugar container with the push button lid broke however a friend produced an unused one from the back of her cupboard. Yay!

Anyhow, today I had to throw out my pastry sheet. The two layers of laminated plastic had finally begun to separate and bubble. It's not high tech, just a plastic sheet with pre-marked circles for rolling out pastry and keeping the mess confined, but after 34 years, even though I don't do all that much baking, I find am oddly bereft. I may have to buy Tupperware again, or search for a replacement sheet of some kind.

No I'm not having a Tupperware party, that would be too silly. Lakeland Plastics, maybe?
jacey: (Default)
Fresh tomatoes, chopped, about 8
spring onions, about 6 (what I had left in the fridge) including the greens
fresh coriander, A handful , pulled fresh off the plant and chucked in
lentils, a handful, (a big handful since I slipped as I was adding them - no problem)
a knob of butter
veggie bouillon powder, about a spoonful
a small squirt of HP sauce
salt & pepper
water.

Soften tomato and onion in butter, add everythig else, cover with water, bring to the boil and then simmer for about an hour. Adjust seasoning to taste. Blend with a soup wand when cooked and cooled.

Who says soups are difficult? Yum!

Mmmm....

Jul. 24th, 2011 06:15 pm
jacey: (Default)
Got the first carrots out of the garden today - baby carrots from the thinnings - and yet another basketful of peas.

So dinner tonight is stuffed pork wrapped in bacon with new potatoes (bought) and home grown carrots and peas. And gravy of course. Dead simple, but very satisfying.

Mmmm....

Jul. 24th, 2011 06:15 pm
jacey: (Default)
Got the first carrots out of the garden today - baby carrots from the thinnings - and yet another basketful of peas.

So dinner tonight is stuffed pork wrapped in bacon with new potatoes (bought) and home grown carrots and peas. And gravy of course. Dead simple, but very satisfying.
jacey: (Default)
Last Saturday was a joint birthday for two friends called Mike. One from Philadelphia, who just happened to be staying with us, and the other local. So we all went out to dinner. It was absolutely the best meal out I've had in a long time, possibly for ever.

The restaurant? The Hepworth on the edge of err... Hepworth, close to Newmill (Huddersfield).

I had a starter of pressed belly pork terrine of ham hock and black pudding with a picallili relish. It was utterly delicious! I didn't want it to end. The portion wasn't huge - but this isn't a stuffing your face type of restaurant. It's all about the flavours and textures - not the quantity.

Then for main course I had pan-roasted Harrogate beef fillet with peppercorn dauce and real chips with a side of mature cheese cauli-cheese. I like my steak looking as though a competent vet could revive it, but I don't like it 'blue'. This was a very generously thick lump of fillet and was cooked to perfection. The French call it 'a point' - which is just on the turn from raw to rare, i.e. warm in the middle but still very rare, Five of us had the fillet and between us we wanted it rare (me), medium rare (3 of us) and medium (BB). The three types of steak were, indeed, distinctly different grades of 'rare'. Everyone was ecstatic.

And for dessert? Creme brulee. Properly caramelised, served with summer fruits and a light-as-a-feather shortbread biscuit plus a little topping of drizzled (set) caramelised sugar crisp. BB had the same as me except for the dessert he had lemon meringue cheesecake - which of course I had to sample. Mmmmmmmm! I also got a sample of H's chocolatey thing, and again... mmmmmmmmm!

Not cheap at about £60 per head including wine, but for what it was, not overpriced either.

It's our 40th wedding anniversary in August... I'm thinking we've just found the perfect place to celebrate.
jacey: (Default)
Last Saturday was a joint birthday for two friends called Mike. One from Philadelphia, who just happened to be staying with us, and the other local. So we all went out to dinner. It was absolutely the best meal out I've had in a long time, possibly for ever.

The restaurant? The Hepworth on the edge of err... Hepworth, close to Newmill (Huddersfield).

I had a starter of pressed belly pork terrine of ham hock and black pudding with a picallili relish. It was utterly delicious! I didn't want it to end. The portion wasn't huge - but this isn't a stuffing your face type of restaurant. It's all about the flavours and textures - not the quantity.

Then for main course I had pan-roasted Harrogate beef fillet with peppercorn dauce and real chips with a side of mature cheese cauli-cheese. I like my steak looking as though a competent vet could revive it, but I don't like it 'blue'. This was a very generously thick lump of fillet and was cooked to perfection. The French call it 'a point' - which is just on the turn from raw to rare, i.e. warm in the middle but still very rare, Five of us had the fillet and between us we wanted it rare (me), medium rare (3 of us) and medium (BB). The three types of steak were, indeed, distinctly different grades of 'rare'. Everyone was ecstatic.

And for dessert? Creme brulee. Properly caramelised, served with summer fruits and a light-as-a-feather shortbread biscuit plus a little topping of drizzled (set) caramelised sugar crisp. BB had the same as me except for the dessert he had lemon meringue cheesecake - which of course I had to sample. Mmmmmmmm! I also got a sample of H's chocolatey thing, and again... mmmmmmmmm!

Not cheap at about £60 per head including wine, but for what it was, not overpriced either.

It's our 40th wedding anniversary in August... I'm thinking we've just found the perfect place to celebrate.

Cake!

Dec. 4th, 2010 05:12 pm
jacey: (Default)
I have baked cake. Three cakes to be precise... for Christmas. One traditional ten inch square Christmas cake to a recipe that the mother of a woman I once worked with (in 1975) cut out of a woman's magazine in the early 1950s. The original recipe being for Prince Charles' christening cake. Of course, like cooks do, we've all messed about with it a bit. No candied peel shall pass the door to my kitchen, for instance, so that part of the recipe was deleted immediately.

The other two are Guinness cakes, which require the boiling up of dried fruits in a mixture of melted butter, brown sugar, a full can of Guinness and mixed spices. (Smells gorgeous and would make a fantastic ice-cream topping in its own right.) Once this is all boiled up, simmered and left to cool you just wallop in eggs and self raising flour and chuck it in the oven.

Simple.

The Guinness cakes are gifts. The standard Christmas cake will be marzipanned and iced for family and visitors.

The Christmas season has begun!

Cake!

Dec. 4th, 2010 05:12 pm
jacey: (Default)
I have baked cake. Three cakes to be precise... for Christmas. One traditional ten inch square Christmas cake to a recipe that the mother of a woman I once worked with (in 1975) cut out of a woman's magazine in the early 1950s. The original recipe being for Prince Charles' christening cake. Of course, like cooks do, we've all messed about with it a bit. No candied peel shall pass the door to my kitchen, for instance, so that part of the recipe was deleted immediately.

The other two are Guinness cakes, which require the boiling up of dried fruits in a mixture of melted butter, brown sugar, a full can of Guinness and mixed spices. (Smells gorgeous and would make a fantastic ice-cream topping in its own right.) Once this is all boiled up, simmered and left to cool you just wallop in eggs and self raising flour and chuck it in the oven.

Simple.

The Guinness cakes are gifts. The standard Christmas cake will be marzipanned and iced for family and visitors.

The Christmas season has begun!
jacey: (Default)
I was looking for inspiration for a meal for two yesterday and my brain hadn't planned in advance. In the fridge I found part of a pack of Sainsbury's fresh beefburgers plus assorted vegetables and on the back of the worktop there was half a bottle of a rather serious red wine with peppery overtones. So:

I onion
2 large carrots
1 parsnip
(all peeled and chopped into small pieces)
I box (or can) of chopped tomatoes in olive oil and garlic.
seasoning: salt, mixed herbs, paprika, 1 beef oxo
Slosh on most of the half bottle of red wine (drink the rest)
Beak 3 beefburgers in half, ball up as meatballs, place on top
Casserole in a moderate oven for about an hour and a half or a bit longer until vegetables are soft & well integrated and meatballs are brown on top.
Serve with creamy mashed potatoes.

Easy and very yum!
jacey: (Default)
I was looking for inspiration for a meal for two yesterday and my brain hadn't planned in advance. In the fridge I found part of a pack of Sainsbury's fresh beefburgers plus assorted vegetables and on the back of the worktop there was half a bottle of a rather serious red wine with peppery overtones. So:

I onion
2 large carrots
1 parsnip
(all peeled and chopped into small pieces)
I box (or can) of chopped tomatoes in olive oil and garlic.
seasoning: salt, mixed herbs, paprika, 1 beef oxo
Slosh on most of the half bottle of red wine (drink the rest)
Beak 3 beefburgers in half, ball up as meatballs, place on top
Casserole in a moderate oven for about an hour and a half or a bit longer until vegetables are soft & well integrated and meatballs are brown on top.
Serve with creamy mashed potatoes.

Easy and very yum!
jacey: (Default)
Salt.

I've just been talking to [livejournal.com profile] mevennen  about cooking a roast chicken (yum!). I'm a plain cook. That's not to say I can't cook more complicated dishes, but mostly I don't have time. My basic cooking method is: take meat (and vegetables), apply heat. That may be roasting, boiling, casseroling or braising, but it's the same basic principle. If I can do the vegetables in the same pot, so much the better. I love one-pot cooking. I've never been able to fathom out why they make casseroles in those tiddly tiny sizes, Even for two of us I use the biggest baddest casserole dish available,

And (raises hand proudly) I USE SALT IN MY COOKING!
With all the health gurus yelling about salt it's almost a sin these days. Well, buggrit! I like salt.

When it comes to roasting meat, I do excellent roast potatoes to go with it - always peeling and boiling the potatoes in salted water before roasting. It gives great flavour with beautifully crunchy outers and soft inners. Yum.

Daughter G and her new husband, I, are polar opposites when it comes to salt. She never puts in in cooking and (possibly because of this) he ladles it on at the table. When they taste my roasties both of them scarf them down with much lipsmacking. Last time they came up to visit she finally asked how I get such a nice flavour. Easy. It's the salt.

No amount of salt added at the table makes up for salt not used in the cooking. It's Just Not The Same.

The health fiends have completely spoiled a whole generaton's attitude towards salt. Unless salt is against doctor's orders there's really no need to treat it like it's poison and a little added in cooking saves a lot added at the table.

Rant over.

jacey: (Default)
Salt.

I've just been talking to [livejournal.com profile] mevennen  about cooking a roast chicken (yum!). I'm a plain cook. That's not to say I can't cook more complicated dishes, but mostly I don't have time. My basic cooking method is: take meat (and vegetables), apply heat. That may be roasting, boiling, casseroling or braising, but it's the same basic principle. If I can do the vegetables in the same pot, so much the better. I love one-pot cooking. I've never been able to fathom out why they make casseroles in those tiddly tiny sizes, Even for two of us I use the biggest baddest casserole dish available,

And (raises hand proudly) I USE SALT IN MY COOKING!
With all the health gurus yelling about salt it's almost a sin these days. Well, buggrit! I like salt.

When it comes to roasting meat, I do excellent roast potatoes to go with it - always peeling and boiling the potatoes in salted water before roasting. It gives great flavour with beautifully crunchy outers and soft inners. Yum.

Daughter G and her new husband, I, are polar opposites when it comes to salt. She never puts in in cooking and (possibly because of this) he ladles it on at the table. When they taste my roasties both of them scarf them down with much lipsmacking. Last time they came up to visit she finally asked how I get such a nice flavour. Easy. It's the salt.

No amount of salt added at the table makes up for salt not used in the cooking. It's Just Not The Same.

The health fiends have completely spoiled a whole generaton's attitude towards salt. Unless salt is against doctor's orders there's really no need to treat it like it's poison and a little added in cooking saves a lot added at the table.

Rant over.

jacey: (Default)
Today I made the bacon and onion stuffing for the Christmas dinner and consigned it safely to the freezer. Now all I need to do is remember to get it out on 24th December so I can bake it on 25th.

Fresh breadcrumbs, 2 onions - soft fried, 8 rashers of bacon - also soft fried (more if it's streaky bacon i.e. American bacon), three smallish eggs, a good pinch of mixed herbs - and a jug blender.

What do you mean how many breadcrumbs? As many as you need to soak up the runny stuff and get the texture right resulting from blending everything but the breadcrumbs together. Let the fried onion and bacon cool before you blend it with the eggs. You don't want them to pre-cook.

I'll layer more whole bacon over the top when I do the final baking.
jacey: (Default)
Today I made the bacon and onion stuffing for the Christmas dinner and consigned it safely to the freezer. Now all I need to do is remember to get it out on 24th December so I can bake it on 25th.

Fresh breadcrumbs, 2 onions - soft fried, 8 rashers of bacon - also soft fried (more if it's streaky bacon i.e. American bacon), three smallish eggs, a good pinch of mixed herbs - and a jug blender.

What do you mean how many breadcrumbs? As many as you need to soak up the runny stuff and get the texture right resulting from blending everything but the breadcrumbs together. Let the fried onion and bacon cool before you blend it with the eggs. You don't want them to pre-cook.

I'll layer more whole bacon over the top when I do the final baking.
jacey: (Default)
With Number One Daughter's wedding little more than a week away the stress is mounting. Son is in London working on the film he's just got a RIBA grant for so he's not at home to either help or hinder. He'll be meeting us in Henley next Thursday when we take possession of the cottage we've hired for three days.

Daughter, of course, is more than stressed. It's her wedding. She's earned the right to be stressed.
:-)
But I'm sure we've got it all covered.

A close friend is doing the flowers. She's not a florist but she's got a track record. We've got a setting out and cleanup team to serve Pimms on the lawn and supervise the buffet and wash up.

We're doing the actual catering ourselves because when the date had to be changed from 22nd to 29th August to avoid a pop festival in Henley we lost the catering firm to a prior booking. My mum and gran catered for my wedding, so I don't see why we shouldn't cater for G's. How does this strike you as a plan and a menu for fifty people?

Barbecued rib-eye steak (we have 3 volunteers, 2 barbecues and the steaks are smallish and cook in 3 mins a side)
Roast salmon garnished with cucumber and fresh parsley (there's only 1 veggie and she eats fish)
Balti-marinaded roasted chicken breasts in a homemade curry/mayo sauce (not quite coronation chicken - nicer I think)
Green salad (mixed leaves)
Pasta salad (haven't decided whether to do it with balsamic vinaigrette dressing or pesto. My fave is the home-made vinaigrette)
Tomato & red onion salad with fresh basil in olive oil
Mixed olives, feta cheese & sunblush tomato
Potato salad with fresh chives
A variety of breads including soft rolls, ciabatta and French
English butter
Brussels pate
Kettle Chips

And for dessert:
Chocolate gateau
Fresh cheesecake
Seasonal fresh berry pavlova
With pouring cream

Cheeses from G's local cheese shop including local cheddar, French brie, local goat cheese
Relevant biscuits and crackers

Plus wedding cake, of course. (I made it, but a local lady is doing the icing)

Yeah, OK, I'm cheating and buying the cheesecakes, pavlova bases and gateaux because I'm in a holiday cottage kitchen.

Questions:
So what else might I need? Am I right in resisting buying pork pie, sausage roll, dips and quiche or should I have them in reserve to put out closer to supper time if we're eating the main meal at 5 or 6 ish? (The wedding's at 2.00 and we've got the hall until midnight.)
How many portions of dessert should I allow for fifty people? I'm thinking 2 cheesecakes (32 portions), 2 gateaux (24 or 32 portions depending on how they're cut) and 4 pavlovas (32 portions)
jacey: (Default)
With Number One Daughter's wedding little more than a week away the stress is mounting. Son is in London working on the film he's just got a RIBA grant for so he's not at home to either help or hinder. He'll be meeting us in Henley next Thursday when we take possession of the cottage we've hired for three days.

Daughter, of course, is more than stressed. It's her wedding. She's earned the right to be stressed.
:-)
But I'm sure we've got it all covered.

A close friend is doing the flowers. She's not a florist but she's got a track record. We've got a setting out and cleanup team to serve Pimms on the lawn and supervise the buffet and wash up.

We're doing the actual catering ourselves because when the date had to be changed from 22nd to 29th August to avoid a pop festival in Henley we lost the catering firm to a prior booking. My mum and gran catered for my wedding, so I don't see why we shouldn't cater for G's. How does this strike you as a plan and a menu for fifty people?

Barbecued rib-eye steak (we have 3 volunteers, 2 barbecues and the steaks are smallish and cook in 3 mins a side)
Roast salmon garnished with cucumber and fresh parsley (there's only 1 veggie and she eats fish)
Balti-marinaded roasted chicken breasts in a homemade curry/mayo sauce (not quite coronation chicken - nicer I think)
Green salad (mixed leaves)
Pasta salad (haven't decided whether to do it with balsamic vinaigrette dressing or pesto. My fave is the home-made vinaigrette)
Tomato & red onion salad with fresh basil in olive oil
Mixed olives, feta cheese & sunblush tomato
Potato salad with fresh chives
A variety of breads including soft rolls, ciabatta and French
English butter
Brussels pate
Kettle Chips

And for dessert:
Chocolate gateau
Fresh cheesecake
Seasonal fresh berry pavlova
With pouring cream

Cheeses from G's local cheese shop including local cheddar, French brie, local goat cheese
Relevant biscuits and crackers

Plus wedding cake, of course. (I made it, but a local lady is doing the icing)

Yeah, OK, I'm cheating and buying the cheesecakes, pavlova bases and gateaux because I'm in a holiday cottage kitchen.

Questions:
So what else might I need? Am I right in resisting buying pork pie, sausage roll, dips and quiche or should I have them in reserve to put out closer to supper time if we're eating the main meal at 5 or 6 ish? (The wedding's at 2.00 and we've got the hall until midnight.)
How many portions of dessert should I allow for fifty people? I'm thinking 2 cheesecakes (32 portions), 2 gateaux (24 or 32 portions depending on how they're cut) and 4 pavlovas (32 portions)
jacey: (Default)
Today I picked: young and tender broad beans, purple sprouting broccoli, small onions (about shallot-sized but they'll grow on once thinned) and carrots from the garden plus another four ripe tomatoes from the indoor plants. There are new potatoes ready in the taty-bags. The swedes are already three inches across and the beets are baby-beet size - about 1 - 2 inches across.

All grown in the new raised beds.
:-)
jacey: (Default)
Today I picked: young and tender broad beans, purple sprouting broccoli, small onions (about shallot-sized but they'll grow on once thinned) and carrots from the garden plus another four ripe tomatoes from the indoor plants. There are new potatoes ready in the taty-bags. The swedes are already three inches across and the beets are baby-beet size - about 1 - 2 inches across.

All grown in the new raised beds.
:-)
jacey: (Default)
Was out of bed at the crack of sparrowfart to help out at the car boot sale in the village which we run to fundraise for the village hall. Spent all morning standing in the sun making bacon sandwiches for sellers and buyers alike. Then I had to take Mum down to the supermarket - actually two supermarkets as we went to Aldi and then to Morrisons to mop up the rest of the list of things we couldn't get at Aldi.  Unfortunately the sun was baking and all the chocolatey things purchsed in Aldi were in danger of turning into choc-puddles in the car when Mum decided to take her time in Morrisons. My fault - she said - because it had been a month since the last time I'd taken her down. Mea culpa. Anyhow, the shopping survived being baked in the car.

And once we got home my feet were so tired from being on them since 7.00 a.m. that I made a long drink of fizzy elderflower and pomegranate codial and took a book out into the garden and sat in the shade of a Rowan tree to read for an hour. Wonderful. I don't give myself permission to do things like that often enough.

I have friends staying, [profile] t_op  and Mylek. Mylek took one look at the slab of salmon I'd hunter-gathered (from Morrisons) for dinner and said, "What are you going to do with that, cos I've got a great recipe." It turned out that he had. Marinade the salmon in a little soy sauce then top it with grated cheese mixed with Hellman's mayonnaise and bake it. We had it with new potatoes and steamed fine beans. Yum! I made a berry fruit salad for dessert (very simply done with strawberries, raspberries and blueberries in red wine with a sprinling of sugar, seved with vanilla ice cream and cream). Lovely!

jacey: (Default)
Was out of bed at the crack of sparrowfart to help out at the car boot sale in the village which we run to fundraise for the village hall. Spent all morning standing in the sun making bacon sandwiches for sellers and buyers alike. Then I had to take Mum down to the supermarket - actually two supermarkets as we went to Aldi and then to Morrisons to mop up the rest of the list of things we couldn't get at Aldi.  Unfortunately the sun was baking and all the chocolatey things purchsed in Aldi were in danger of turning into choc-puddles in the car when Mum decided to take her time in Morrisons. My fault - she said - because it had been a month since the last time I'd taken her down. Mea culpa. Anyhow, the shopping survived being baked in the car.

And once we got home my feet were so tired from being on them since 7.00 a.m. that I made a long drink of fizzy elderflower and pomegranate codial and took a book out into the garden and sat in the shade of a Rowan tree to read for an hour. Wonderful. I don't give myself permission to do things like that often enough.

I have friends staying, [profile] t_op  and Mylek. Mylek took one look at the slab of salmon I'd hunter-gathered (from Morrisons) for dinner and said, "What are you going to do with that, cos I've got a great recipe." It turned out that he had. Marinade the salmon in a little soy sauce then top it with grated cheese mixed with Hellman's mayonnaise and bake it. We had it with new potatoes and steamed fine beans. Yum! I made a berry fruit salad for dessert (very simply done with strawberries, raspberries and blueberries in red wine with a sprinling of sugar, seved with vanilla ice cream and cream). Lovely!

jacey: (Default)
I'm sending out f-locked posts to a small group of people who are on my weight-watching list. (I've lost ten pounds so far.) If you want to be on my weekly bulletin let me know and I'll add you to that list - but I appreciate it's not for everyone.

Anyhow, tonight I've made a big curry and thought I'd share the recipe.

Jacey's Low Cal /Low Fat Curry


This makes a big pot that feeds about 6 people depending on appetites.
I like my curry mild but flavourful. Add more curry paste if you like it hotter.

Onions - 2 large, peeled and chopped
Leeks - 1 large or 2 small, washed and chopped (If no leeks you can add an extra onion)
Carrots - 2 large, peeled and chopped into small pieces
Parsnip - 2 small or one larger peeled and chopped into small pieces
Cauliflower - half a decent sized head, chopped small
Red chilli - 1 de-seeded and chopped small
Apple - 1 large Braeburn or similar, peeled, cored and chopped
Ginger marmalade - 1 heaped teaspoon
Black raisins - 1 tablespoon - optional
Canned chopped tomatoes with garlic - 2 cans (though you could manage with one and add some fresh tomatoes
Curry paste - I used Sharwood's Balti tonight, about a quarter of a jar but more or less to taste. You can augmenty it with a little curry powder and cayenne pepper to taste.
Salt to taste (not much)
Meat - either a small amount of chicken breast (say 3 smallish breasts for the whole pot) or a bit of fresh or frozen lamb mince - say 250 g for the whole pot. Meat is optional, you could just add a couple of extra carrots and parsnips and maybe another onion and have a vegetable curry.
NOTE: no oil apart from what's in the curry paste

It makes about 6 - 8 normal sized portions depending on your definition of normal (BB can easily eat twice as much as I can and he calls his portions normal as well.)

A small portion of basmati rice to go with it is only 1.5 points or 3 points for a bigger portion. Yum.

Prepare all the veg. Obviously it doesn't matter if you substitute extra carrots for the parsnips or the other way around. This is probably never the same twice.

Sweat the onions and leeks very slowly until soft but not caramelised
Add the remaining fresh vegetables and fruit, allow to cook gently with the onions for about 15 minutes.
Add the curry paste and stir in thoroughly
Add the canned tomatoes and ginger marmalade.
Simmer for about an hour. Check seasoning and add more curry paste if necessary. (If it's too hot add some more marmalade and some cooked chopped potatoes.)

If using lamb mince add it now and simmer for a further fifteen minutes.

If using chicken breast, chop it into thin slices add it right at the end. Simmer for only as long as it takes to cook the chicken through. (Don't overcook it so that the chicken dries out.)

This can all be prepared in advance and reheated on the stove top, but if preparing in advance i would still cook the chicken from raw at the last minute as it will be much more moist and tender.

Serve over basmati rice.

Don't forget the naan bread, poppadoms, raita and pickles add more calories than are in the curry. The weight watchers cost is 3 points for a portion of the curry roughtly equivalent to a sixth of this, plus 1.5 points for a sdmall portion of rice of 3 points for a larger portion

jacey: (Default)
I'm sending out f-locked posts to a small group of people who are on my weight-watching list. (I've lost ten pounds so far.) If you want to be on my weekly bulletin let me know and I'll add you to that list - but I appreciate it's not for everyone.

Anyhow, tonight I've made a big curry and thought I'd share the recipe.

Jacey's Low Cal /Low Fat Curry


This makes a big pot that feeds about 6 people depending on appetites.
I like my curry mild but flavourful. Add more curry paste if you like it hotter.

Onions - 2 large, peeled and chopped
Leeks - 1 large or 2 small, washed and chopped (If no leeks you can add an extra onion)
Carrots - 2 large, peeled and chopped into small pieces
Parsnip - 2 small or one larger peeled and chopped into small pieces
Cauliflower - half a decent sized head, chopped small
Red chilli - 1 de-seeded and chopped small
Apple - 1 large Braeburn or similar, peeled, cored and chopped
Ginger marmalade - 1 heaped teaspoon
Black raisins - 1 tablespoon - optional
Canned chopped tomatoes with garlic - 2 cans (though you could manage with one and add some fresh tomatoes
Curry paste - I used Sharwood's Balti tonight, about a quarter of a jar but more or less to taste. You can augmenty it with a little curry powder and cayenne pepper to taste.
Salt to taste (not much)
Meat - either a small amount of chicken breast (say 3 smallish breasts for the whole pot) or a bit of fresh or frozen lamb mince - say 250 g for the whole pot. Meat is optional, you could just add a couple of extra carrots and parsnips and maybe another onion and have a vegetable curry.
NOTE: no oil apart from what's in the curry paste

It makes about 6 - 8 normal sized portions depending on your definition of normal (BB can easily eat twice as much as I can and he calls his portions normal as well.)

A small portion of basmati rice to go with it is only 1.5 points or 3 points for a bigger portion. Yum.

Prepare all the veg. Obviously it doesn't matter if you substitute extra carrots for the parsnips or the other way around. This is probably never the same twice.

Sweat the onions and leeks very slowly until soft but not caramelised
Add the remaining fresh vegetables and fruit, allow to cook gently with the onions for about 15 minutes.
Add the curry paste and stir in thoroughly
Add the canned tomatoes and ginger marmalade.
Simmer for about an hour. Check seasoning and add more curry paste if necessary. (If it's too hot add some more marmalade and some cooked chopped potatoes.)

If using lamb mince add it now and simmer for a further fifteen minutes.

If using chicken breast, chop it into thin slices add it right at the end. Simmer for only as long as it takes to cook the chicken through. (Don't overcook it so that the chicken dries out.)

This can all be prepared in advance and reheated on the stove top, but if preparing in advance i would still cook the chicken from raw at the last minute as it will be much more moist and tender.

Serve over basmati rice.

Don't forget the naan bread, poppadoms, raita and pickles add more calories than are in the curry. The weight watchers cost is 3 points for a portion of the curry roughtly equivalent to a sixth of this, plus 1.5 points for a sdmall portion of rice of 3 points for a larger portion

jacey: (Default)
Have made two enormous Christmas Cakes yesterday and brandied them today - way late but now they're wrapped in foil and waiting to be marzipanned and iced. I make good Christmas Cake. Also have the Guinness and Whiskey fruit cake maturing nicely in foil - made a couple of weeks ago. That one doesn't get marzipanned and iced.

Of course all Christmas cake should be eaten with mature cheddar cheeese.

Christmas Cake
Jacey Bedford

Can be made well in advance. I can't claim to be the originator of this recipe, though  altered it a bit because I dislike candied peel... but it was handed down to me by Evelyn (surname forgotten), in Barnsley Library ion 1975. Her mum cut it out of a magazine in the 1950s and adapted it. It was originally the recipe for Prince Charles' christening cake! Wherever it came from, it has done good service as a recipe for special occasions.

8oz butter or soft margarine
10oz dark brown sugar
5 eggs, (medium size)
8oz plain flour
4oz ground almonds
2lb dried fruit (I use a mix of sultanas, currants raisins)
4oz glacé cherries
4 tablespoons of brandy - at least. I use more! (Pour on after cooking)

Use  a loose-bottomed square tin. There's enough mix here to make a fairly shallow 10" cake, a chunkier 9" one or two shallow 8" cakes, (but reduce the cooking time for these or they'll be too dry).

1) Cream the butter (or margarine) and brown sugar.
2) Add the eggs one at a time and mix in thoroughly. (To prevent the mix from curdling add a spoonful of flour from the measured quantity with each egg.)
3) Fold in the rest of the flour and the ground almonds.
4) Add the fruit and glacé cherries and mix well.
5) Place the mixture in a  prepared, lined, loose-bottomed cake tin (or tins). Shape a slight hollow in the centre so you get a level finish when the cake rises. (Note it doesn't rise much.)
6) (Fight the kids to see who gets to lick out the bowl! Decide to share it equally.)

7) Bake at 275ºF - Approx. 140ºC/ Gas Mark 1 - for about three to four hours depending on the size of tin you use and how "fast" your oven is.
8) When cool, pierce the cake all over with a skewer and dribble the brandy into the holes to let it soak in. (Use cheap brandy, the cake isn't fussy... and you'll be able to be more liberal with it. I always use lots more than the recipe says.) Leave the paper round the cake until after this process, otherwise some of the brandy dribbles over the edge.
9) Remove the paper, add marzipan and icing as and if required. Yum!

All the usual caveats re nut allergies. It DOES contain nuts (in case you couldn't work that out for yourself).



jacey: (Default)
Have made two enormous Christmas Cakes yesterday and brandied them today - way late but now they're wrapped in foil and waiting to be marzipanned and iced. I make good Christmas Cake. Also have the Guinness and Whiskey fruit cake maturing nicely in foil - made a couple of weeks ago. That one doesn't get marzipanned and iced.

Of course all Christmas cake should be eaten with mature cheddar cheeese.

Christmas Cake
Jacey Bedford

Can be made well in advance. I can't claim to be the originator of this recipe, though  altered it a bit because I dislike candied peel... but it was handed down to me by Evelyn (surname forgotten), in Barnsley Library ion 1975. Her mum cut it out of a magazine in the 1950s and adapted it. It was originally the recipe for Prince Charles' christening cake! Wherever it came from, it has done good service as a recipe for special occasions.

8oz butter or soft margarine
10oz dark brown sugar
5 eggs, (medium size)
8oz plain flour
4oz ground almonds
2lb dried fruit (I use a mix of sultanas, currants raisins)
4oz glacé cherries
4 tablespoons of brandy - at least. I use more! (Pour on after cooking)

Use  a loose-bottomed square tin. There's enough mix here to make a fairly shallow 10" cake, a chunkier 9" one or two shallow 8" cakes, (but reduce the cooking time for these or they'll be too dry).

1) Cream the butter (or margarine) and brown sugar.
2) Add the eggs one at a time and mix in thoroughly. (To prevent the mix from curdling add a spoonful of flour from the measured quantity with each egg.)
3) Fold in the rest of the flour and the ground almonds.
4) Add the fruit and glacé cherries and mix well.
5) Place the mixture in a  prepared, lined, loose-bottomed cake tin (or tins). Shape a slight hollow in the centre so you get a level finish when the cake rises. (Note it doesn't rise much.)
6) (Fight the kids to see who gets to lick out the bowl! Decide to share it equally.)

7) Bake at 275ºF - Approx. 140ºC/ Gas Mark 1 - for about three to four hours depending on the size of tin you use and how "fast" your oven is.
8) When cool, pierce the cake all over with a skewer and dribble the brandy into the holes to let it soak in. (Use cheap brandy, the cake isn't fussy... and you'll be able to be more liberal with it. I always use lots more than the recipe says.) Leave the paper round the cake until after this process, otherwise some of the brandy dribbles over the edge.
9) Remove the paper, add marzipan and icing as and if required. Yum!

All the usual caveats re nut allergies. It DOES contain nuts (in case you couldn't work that out for yourself).



jacey: (Default)
It's amazing how much soup you can make with two leeks, two potatoes and a few stock granules (not even real stock this time). I'm beginning to think someone's put a spell on my soup pot to turn it into a never-ending one. I'm going to have to freeze some of this since - sadly - Best Beloved is not a soup person. But first I'll just have another helping... mmmm....
jacey: (Default)
It's amazing how much soup you can make with two leeks, two potatoes and a few stock granules (not even real stock this time). I'm beginning to think someone's put a spell on my soup pot to turn it into a never-ending one. I'm going to have to freeze some of this since - sadly - Best Beloved is not a soup person. But first I'll just have another helping... mmmm....
jacey: (Default)
Just baked two cakes for this evening's concert and the recipe is so easy I thought I'd share it with you. Americans please note that this uses SR - i.e. self raising - flour so you need to add your own raising agent to normal flour before you start and then add the bi-carb soda  (that's baking soda to you) as an extra.

Extra note. This cake contains no wacky and I'm pretty sure that the local lady who passed it on to me didn't even know you could bake wacky substances into cakes so the name is historical and not meant to mislead.

Mrs Green's Chocolate Whacky Cake

8 oz S R flour
1 level tsp bicarbonate of soda
pinch of salt
2 tbsp cocoa (I'm often a bit generous with this!)
8 oz sugar
Mix all these dry ingredients together in a large bowl

Melt 5 oz margarine in a pan
Add   1 tbsp vinegar
          1 tsp vanilla essence
         ½ pt tepid water

Add the liquid to the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly to make a batter. Pour into a greased pan approx 10 inches square and bake for 35 mins at gas regulo 5 or 375°F or 190°C. (To make it easier to lift out I put a greasproof paper liner in the pan with 'handles' sticking up over the sides.)

When baked and still hot from the oven put squares of dark chocolate on top to melt and spread it over the top of the cake. (The cake rises into a dome but should sink to level as it cools.) I use about half of a 100 gram bar of chocolate.

Can be eaten hot as a pudding with custard or cream. Or it can be eaten as a cake - fresh as soon as the chocolate is set, but is also great if wrapped in foil and left for a few days to mature and go a bit sticky in the middle. In our house it often doesn't survive that long, however, unless I hide it. (Unfortunately I can't hide it from me.)

Enjoy.

jacey: (Default)
Just baked two cakes for this evening's concert and the recipe is so easy I thought I'd share it with you. Americans please note that this uses SR - i.e. self raising - flour so you need to add your own raising agent to normal flour before you start and then add the bi-carb soda  (that's baking soda to you) as an extra.

Extra note. This cake contains no wacky and I'm pretty sure that the local lady who passed it on to me didn't even know you could bake wacky substances into cakes so the name is historical and not meant to mislead.

Mrs Green's Chocolate Whacky Cake

8 oz S R flour
1 level tsp bicarbonate of soda
pinch of salt
2 tbsp cocoa (I'm often a bit generous with this!)
8 oz sugar
Mix all these dry ingredients together in a large bowl

Melt 5 oz margarine in a pan
Add   1 tbsp vinegar
          1 tsp vanilla essence
         ½ pt tepid water

Add the liquid to the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly to make a batter. Pour into a greased pan approx 10 inches square and bake for 35 mins at gas regulo 5 or 375°F or 190°C. (To make it easier to lift out I put a greasproof paper liner in the pan with 'handles' sticking up over the sides.)

When baked and still hot from the oven put squares of dark chocolate on top to melt and spread it over the top of the cake. (The cake rises into a dome but should sink to level as it cools.) I use about half of a 100 gram bar of chocolate.

Can be eaten hot as a pudding with custard or cream. Or it can be eaten as a cake - fresh as soon as the chocolate is set, but is also great if wrapped in foil and left for a few days to mature and go a bit sticky in the middle. In our house it often doesn't survive that long, however, unless I hide it. (Unfortunately I can't hide it from me.)

Enjoy.

jacey: (Default)
I realised when I posted my bit about the vegan food at Milford that I'm such a typical product of my post-war Yorkshire upbringing that my comfort-zone, food-wise is fairly limited, however lest you think meals chez-Jacey consist of nothing by meat and two veg a typical autumn/winter week at our house might include (but not exclusively) any of the following:
1) roast dinner - i.e. chicken or roast gammon ham (sometimes roast beef but not as often) with roast potatoes, carrots, cauliflower or broccoli, Yorkshire pudding (because Best Beloved loves it) and gravy
2) stir fry chicken - heavy on the chinese veg and light on the chicken - with a chow mein (or similar) sauce
3) fish and chips (home made) or oven baked fish (maybe salmon or sea bass or, if I'm feeling rich, arctic ice fish)
4) Thai green curry (mild) or mild Indian curry made with potato and cauliflower; sometimes with chicken sometimes just veggie
5) slow braised pork steak with gravy
6) casserole with beef or chicken and lots of vegetables with tomato, garlic and red wine (a one-pot meal)
7) sausage (made by local butcher) and mash
8) lamb mince stew with leeks, potatoes, carrots, and anything else that's in the fridge
9) Italian style meat and tomato sauce served with pasta of some sort - maybe as a lasagne or a spag. bol.
10) liver and onions in gravy
11) tuna and rice bake
12) cabbage and leek casserole.with pork chop or chicken thighs slow baked on top (another one-pot meal)
13) cauliflower cheese with bacon
14) omelette (I meak great omelette - very light. Plain or with a variety of fillings - most often cheese)
15) stuffed chicken breasts wrapped in bacon and oven cooked in 'parcels'

Veggies include: mashed potato and swede (together or separate), boiled potato, baby new potatoes, (and very occasionally frozen oven chips), carrot, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, onion, leek., green beans, peas beetroot (roasted, yum), sprouts (in season) and sometimes sweet potato. I will put courgettes and tomato and occasionally very small amounts of squash in some specific dishes, but not often and I tolerate the squash barely. I won't ever use aubergines or peppers of any description. And I always cook with salt. I especially can't eat potato cooked without salt - adding it afterwards is not the same.

Plus I make my own bread and I make a wide variety of soups, both veggie and meaty, chunky and blended.
jacey: (Default)
I realised when I posted my bit about the vegan food at Milford that I'm such a typical product of my post-war Yorkshire upbringing that my comfort-zone, food-wise is fairly limited, however lest you think meals chez-Jacey consist of nothing by meat and two veg a typical autumn/winter week at our house might include (but not exclusively) any of the following:
1) roast dinner - i.e. chicken or roast gammon ham (sometimes roast beef but not as often) with roast potatoes, carrots, cauliflower or broccoli, Yorkshire pudding (because Best Beloved loves it) and gravy
2) stir fry chicken - heavy on the chinese veg and light on the chicken - with a chow mein (or similar) sauce
3) fish and chips (home made) or oven baked fish (maybe salmon or sea bass or, if I'm feeling rich, arctic ice fish)
4) Thai green curry (mild) or mild Indian curry made with potato and cauliflower; sometimes with chicken sometimes just veggie
5) slow braised pork steak with gravy
6) casserole with beef or chicken and lots of vegetables with tomato, garlic and red wine (a one-pot meal)
7) sausage (made by local butcher) and mash
8) lamb mince stew with leeks, potatoes, carrots, and anything else that's in the fridge
9) Italian style meat and tomato sauce served with pasta of some sort - maybe as a lasagne or a spag. bol.
10) liver and onions in gravy
11) tuna and rice bake
12) cabbage and leek casserole.with pork chop or chicken thighs slow baked on top (another one-pot meal)
13) cauliflower cheese with bacon
14) omelette (I meak great omelette - very light. Plain or with a variety of fillings - most often cheese)
15) stuffed chicken breasts wrapped in bacon and oven cooked in 'parcels'

Veggies include: mashed potato and swede (together or separate), boiled potato, baby new potatoes, (and very occasionally frozen oven chips), carrot, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, onion, leek., green beans, peas beetroot (roasted, yum), sprouts (in season) and sometimes sweet potato. I will put courgettes and tomato and occasionally very small amounts of squash in some specific dishes, but not often and I tolerate the squash barely. I won't ever use aubergines or peppers of any description. And I always cook with salt. I especially can't eat potato cooked without salt - adding it afterwards is not the same.

Plus I make my own bread and I make a wide variety of soups, both veggie and meaty, chunky and blended.
jacey: (Default)
bluehairsue just posted thoughts in response to the food meme that many of my flist did last week and she set me thinking about the ethics and otherwise of food.

I am not a fancy foodie though I could tick some of the boxes on the food meme accidentally. Yes, I've eaten alligator (tastes like fishy chicken) and funnel cake (tastes like hot Blackpool doughnuts) but I've never gone out of my way to eat strange stuff for the sake of it. I'm just as happy with fish and chipsbecause someone was paying me to be at a food and folk festival. Add blooming onions, pit-beef and pulled pork to that list which seem exotic to a Yorkshire girl... but I've never gone out of my way to eat strange stuff for the sake of it. I'm just as happy with fish and chips.

Best Beloved is a 'food as fuel' type and I am a 'food as comfort' type and since comfort-food tends to be fuel-food we largely get on just fine at the dinner table. I'm not ethical for the sake of it, but reducing food miles is just common sense. Our local farm shop mostly sells home grown seasonal veg. I bought five huge cauliflowers for a pound last week because all their caulis are ready at once and they were encouraging people to buy them. (Home-frozen cauli makes decent cauli-cheese and is fine in Thai-green-anything.) At the same time as the Great-Cauli-Grab I bought a bunch of mucky carrots with their tops on. I saw the farmer walk down the field and into the shop with them, baught the carrots five minutes later and two hours after that they were on my plate. Beautiful.

I'm an old fashioned cook and in many ways what our mothers taught us makes sense. Eat seasonal stuff when it's cheap; don't throw away anything that's fit to be turned into a meal. I know how to boil a chicken carcass (or any old bones) for stock. I can make soup. I can bake a cake or (if pushed) make a pie. I can make a tasty meal out of  the contents of my store cupboard (rice, tuna, Campbell's condensed mushroom soup) of the leftovers in my fridge (cabbage, leek, apple, Campbell's condensed chicken soup) And I know how to bake bread without a machine, though I confess I use the machine my daughter gave me because it makes so much sense NOT to heat a whole oven for one loaf. (I very rarely buy ready made bread there days.) I can trim and joint a half hindquarter of beef without passing out at bloody hunks of flesh in a big box and I can turn the scrap bits into something tasty.

Christmas dinner for fourteen holds no fears for me.

Being able to deal with fresh food just makes so much sense. Why pay someone to make a ready meal for you when the meal you get ready yourself is tastier and you can control what goes into it?

Of course, I'm not a fancy cook. I don't even really like cooking most of the time and I spend as little time as possible in the kitchen because I've got a life. (I actually seem to have many lives at the moment and would like a break from some of them.) The range of what I am prepared to stand and fuss over is limited. Note I don't say my skill is limited because - hey - I can read a recipe book. I mostly work on the principle of: take food; apply heat until it looks/smells right; eat.

It comes down to Richard Adams who said that evolution had changed Man's essential question from 'What shall we eat?' to 'Where shall we do lunch?'
jacey: (Default)
bluehairsue just posted thoughts in response to the food meme that many of my flist did last week and she set me thinking about the ethics and otherwise of food.

I am not a fancy foodie though I could tick some of the boxes on the food meme accidentally. Yes, I've eaten alligator (tastes like fishy chicken) and funnel cake (tastes like hot Blackpool doughnuts) but I've never gone out of my way to eat strange stuff for the sake of it. I'm just as happy with fish and chipsbecause someone was paying me to be at a food and folk festival. Add blooming onions, pit-beef and pulled pork to that list which seem exotic to a Yorkshire girl... but I've never gone out of my way to eat strange stuff for the sake of it. I'm just as happy with fish and chips.

Best Beloved is a 'food as fuel' type and I am a 'food as comfort' type and since comfort-food tends to be fuel-food we largely get on just fine at the dinner table. I'm not ethical for the sake of it, but reducing food miles is just common sense. Our local farm shop mostly sells home grown seasonal veg. I bought five huge cauliflowers for a pound last week because all their caulis are ready at once and they were encouraging people to buy them. (Home-frozen cauli makes decent cauli-cheese and is fine in Thai-green-anything.) At the same time as the Great-Cauli-Grab I bought a bunch of mucky carrots with their tops on. I saw the farmer walk down the field and into the shop with them, baught the carrots five minutes later and two hours after that they were on my plate. Beautiful.

I'm an old fashioned cook and in many ways what our mothers taught us makes sense. Eat seasonal stuff when it's cheap; don't throw away anything that's fit to be turned into a meal. I know how to boil a chicken carcass (or any old bones) for stock. I can make soup. I can bake a cake or (if pushed) make a pie. I can make a tasty meal out of  the contents of my store cupboard (rice, tuna, Campbell's condensed mushroom soup) of the leftovers in my fridge (cabbage, leek, apple, Campbell's condensed chicken soup) And I know how to bake bread without a machine, though I confess I use the machine my daughter gave me because it makes so much sense NOT to heat a whole oven for one loaf. (I very rarely buy ready made bread there days.) I can trim and joint a half hindquarter of beef without passing out at bloody hunks of flesh in a big box and I can turn the scrap bits into something tasty.

Christmas dinner for fourteen holds no fears for me.

Being able to deal with fresh food just makes so much sense. Why pay someone to make a ready meal for you when the meal you get ready yourself is tastier and you can control what goes into it?

Of course, I'm not a fancy cook. I don't even really like cooking most of the time and I spend as little time as possible in the kitchen because I've got a life. (I actually seem to have many lives at the moment and would like a break from some of them.) The range of what I am prepared to stand and fuss over is limited. Note I don't say my skill is limited because - hey - I can read a recipe book. I mostly work on the principle of: take food; apply heat until it looks/smells right; eat.

It comes down to Richard Adams who said that evolution had changed Man's essential question from 'What shall we eat?' to 'Where shall we do lunch?'
jacey: (Default)
Late last night...
Finished the first run through the magic pirate adventure quest novel following [profile] brownnicky's hugely fast beta read of the first draft and a few of her comments that made me go duh-oh, of course. It didn't change too much, just pinned down mommy-dearest in the grand scheme of things and added one somewhat raunchy scene in which our heroine gets to grips with rival Pirate Gentleman Jim Anderton. (And yest I do mean 'gets to grip with'... though it's coitus very much interruptus... the earth moves too soon - helped by explosives.) Have sent the Beta Two version to [profile] bluehairsue since I doubt she'll have started on Beta One (waves to Sue) while on her ski-trip.

There are still things to alter and beef up following [profile] brownnicky's extremely helpful comments, but I'm going to wait for my other two beta readers before going any further.

Staring this morning...
* Dashed down to Morrison's for ingredients
* Made two huge pots of curry - enough to feed 30 people. One Korma and one Madras. It's my turn to cater for the Quiz Night down at the village hall tonight. Curry in quantity holds no fears for me.
* Made two chocolate wacky cakes (24 portions - for above event)
* Made 12 chocolate cheesecake muffins (as above)
* Did the graphics for a full page, full colour ad in a national music magazine (fiddly and time consuming but rewarding)
* Confirmed four gigs for touring artists

Right, OK... I'm out of time. I'm off down to the village hall now. Hope I get the several gallons of curry there without slopping them over the boot of the car. Post Office elastic bands are my friend. I haven't even given a thought to answering the quiz questions. I think my brain has possibly died of curry. I always join a different quiz team since I'm a floating committee person and can generally be relied upon to get a decent percentage of questions right.
jacey: (Default)
Late last night...
Finished the first run through the magic pirate adventure quest novel following [profile] brownnicky's hugely fast beta read of the first draft and a few of her comments that made me go duh-oh, of course. It didn't change too much, just pinned down mommy-dearest in the grand scheme of things and added one somewhat raunchy scene in which our heroine gets to grips with rival Pirate Gentleman Jim Anderton. (And yest I do mean 'gets to grip with'... though it's coitus very much interruptus... the earth moves too soon - helped by explosives.) Have sent the Beta Two version to [profile] bluehairsue since I doubt she'll have started on Beta One (waves to Sue) while on her ski-trip.

There are still things to alter and beef up following [profile] brownnicky's extremely helpful comments, but I'm going to wait for my other two beta readers before going any further.

Staring this morning...
* Dashed down to Morrison's for ingredients
* Made two huge pots of curry - enough to feed 30 people. One Korma and one Madras. It's my turn to cater for the Quiz Night down at the village hall tonight. Curry in quantity holds no fears for me.
* Made two chocolate wacky cakes (24 portions - for above event)
* Made 12 chocolate cheesecake muffins (as above)
* Did the graphics for a full page, full colour ad in a national music magazine (fiddly and time consuming but rewarding)
* Confirmed four gigs for touring artists

Right, OK... I'm out of time. I'm off down to the village hall now. Hope I get the several gallons of curry there without slopping them over the boot of the car. Post Office elastic bands are my friend. I haven't even given a thought to answering the quiz questions. I think my brain has possibly died of curry. I always join a different quiz team since I'm a floating committee person and can generally be relied upon to get a decent percentage of questions right.

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