jacey: (blue eyes)
HarveysThe Harvey Family - Margaret on the left.

Back in 2011 I posted some recollections of my college riding club days and riding at the stables in Menston, Near Otley, Yorks, run by Margaret Harvey. Margaret was a character. Even when we knew her in the 1970s she seemed to be a little out of time - a relic of those 1950s pony books that I grew up reading, a mixture of tweedy pony club and jolly hockey sticks with an exceedingly gung-ho attitude to almost everything.

I lost touch with Margaret. She seemed so much older than us at the time we knew her (everyone over thirty was ancient, of course) so back in 2011 I figured she was probably dead. It turns out I was wrong then, though sadly she died just before Christmas in late 2015, so this is a retrospective. Margaret and I communicated by email briefly, but she had a fall and then a stroke and one thing led to another...

I am a member of the Wharfedale Riding School facebook group. Ex-pupils, helpers and employees have been posting photographs of Margaret's remarkable life with horses, some of the slightly fuzzy ones are scanned from newspaper articles.

Here are some of them.


1950s. A Very Big Adventure. Margaret leads a trek from Menston to Malton. The gypsy vardo on the right was always in stable yeard when I used to ride there.
MH Trek Menston to Malton


1858. Margaret with Wharfedale Gay Metal, winners at the Bramham Hunter Trials.
MH-Metal 1958 - Winner Bramham Hunter Trials

1960 Margaret Metal and some of his trophies
MH Metal 1960 Trophies


Margaret riding Metal (the grey) and Heather Willett riding Star, Margaret's other great jumping pony. Both ponies lived to a ripe old age.
1960 MH on Metal, Heather Willett on Star

Margaret in 1973 winning the Winter Riders in Doncaster on Kestrel, her own home-bred appaloosa stallion who sired a great many of the foals that she bred. She beat many of the famous names of the day.
Kestrel 1973 winning Winter Riders, Doncaster

As late as 2013. Margaret with Ravennah, the great great granddaughter of one of her favourite mares, Honey. By this time the riding school was long gone, but not all the horses.
Margaret & Ravennah

Margaret Harvey RIP.
jacey: (Default)
Despite having reservations about the book, the film was lovely. Spectacular camera work. My eyes leaked all the way through it, of course, but horses get me every time.

Kudos to the seven horses who played Joey. Thanks to good makeup they were indistinguishable from each other.on screen. I assume 'no horses were harmed in the making of this movie' (the usual disclaimer) in which case I'd be really interested to know how they managed some of the shots, especially one where the horse jumps a trench, misses his landing and falls backwards into it. Stunt horse? Very clever CGI?  I don't know, but it was certainly extremely realistic.

My main reservation about the book was the horse point of view, very Black Beauty with not even a pretence that the horse is anything less than human in outlook and knowledge. The movie, of course, removed this completely. The horse is a horse and we see everything through the eye of the camera not the horse.

So for those of you who don't know, it's the story of Joey, a thoroughbred-type horse who is raised by Albert on a farm in Devon and sold to the cavalry by Albert's impoverished dad when the First World War breaks out. Albert swears to find Joey again once he's old enough to join up. The film follows Joey through the war and the lives of the people he touches on both sides of No Man's Land.

There are a few diversions from the book, but the movie plot is pretty close in feel and the major events are in there even if they are arrived at in a slightly roundabout way. I haven't seen the stage play so the movie might be closer to that than the book. The story highlights the horrors of war and the small kindnesses that emphasise humanity. Yes, it's got a sentimental streak a mile wide, and even in its darkest hour you just know that it's not going to end up with Joey as meat, but there are plenty of twists and turns before Albert makes good on his promise.

My one disappointment was that I had hoped that some of John Tams' music might have made it from the stage play to the movie. Sadly, it didn't. I'd love to see the stage play if it comes on tour.
jacey: (Default)
More for [livejournal.com profile] morphlet 

Margaret Harvey always seemed to be batty - and she was, indeed, horse mad. She was an excellent rider and bred several different lines of horses - Fell ponies, Dales ponies and a general line of horses and ponies from her stallion, Kestrel. I'm not sure when the following photos were taken, they were given to me by one of the girls who lived in Menston and had known Margaret for years. Margaret's real problem was that she loved all her horses and ponies and couldn't bear to get rid of them, so their numbers kept increasing. She always seemed to be on the borderline of broke, though I guess the family had money at one time. (Margaret had been a society debutante in her youth - I saw the photos and she was gorgeous!) By the time I knew her she lived with her mother (who seemed to disapprove of the horsy lifestyle) and there was a sister whom I saw once from a distance, but never met.


Margaret on Kestrel. Date unknown - possibly late 1960s



Margaret Harvey. [livejournal.com profile] morphlet , is this horse Honey?



Margaret Harvey is central on the horse I think is Honey. I don't know the other two riders but the horse on the left is Major and the one on the right looks like an offspring of the one in the middle. Look at their heads.

One more post and more pics to come.

jacey: (Default)
More for [livejournal.com profile] morphlet 

Margaret Harvey always seemed to be batty - and she was, indeed, horse mad. She was an excellent rider and bred several different lines of horses - Fell ponies, Dales ponies and a general line of horses and ponies from her stallion, Kestrel. I'm not sure when the following photos were taken, they were given to me by one of the girls who lived in Menston and had known Margaret for years. Margaret's real problem was that she loved all her horses and ponies and couldn't bear to get rid of them, so their numbers kept increasing. She always seemed to be on the borderline of broke, though I guess the family had money at one time. (Margaret had been a society debutante in her youth - I saw the photos and she was gorgeous!) By the time I knew her she lived with her mother (who seemed to disapprove of the horsy lifestyle) and there was a sister whom I saw once from a distance, but never met.


Margaret on Kestrel. Date unknown - possibly late 1960s



Margaret Harvey. [livejournal.com profile] morphlet , is this horse Honey?



Margaret Harvey is central on the horse I think is Honey. I don't know the other two riders but the horse on the left is Major and the one on the right looks like an offspring of the one in the middle. Look at their heads.

One more post and more pics to come.

jacey: (Default)

I'm not sure how we found Margaret Harvey's Wharfedale Riding School, but someone decided to start a riding club at college (Leeds School of Librarianship had been independent, but by that time was part of Leeds Polytechnic and the Student Union had fundingand a minibus). I'm sure there must have been more than just us few in the club but six out of the eight people here were library students if you include me behind the camera. Left to right: Jenny Fisher (now Downsborough); Eileen Gomersall (now Jack); Jan Booth (now Warner). On the pony (Cracker) is John French - not a librarian. Then there's Yvonne Smith (can't remember her maiden name). Kneeling is Teddi Craven (now Coutts) and back right is Pete whose surname I've forgotten. Sadly pete was killed in the seventies in a road accident in Africa. The dog is called Vandal. Location; Margaret's stable yard - a mews of tumbledown brick buildings off Station Road in Menston (between Guisely and Otley in what's now West Yorkshire, but was then the West Riding of Yorkshire. Missing from the photo are regulars Mike Heywood and Lindsey (now Lindsey Heywood). We were a mixture of riders and beginners, but everyone seemed to muddle along. Eileen later went on to train in Germany and became ferociously good.



Jan on Robin; Jacey on Dominic and Teddi on Blossom. I think this was the last day of the college riding club and we were arsing about up in the gorse field, hard hats removed for the camera.


Left: Jan on Robin. All Kestrel's offspring were instantly recognisable by their heads regardless of size of pony. I wasn't all that keen on Robin, but Jan loved him.
Right: Me on Blossom. I should be eternally grateful to her for not bucking me off at this point.


Jan on Dominic. He was a nice ride, a good all rounder and very untypical of Margaret Harvey's horses being neither obviously from the same line as Kestrel or Fell/Dales. Possibly that's why I always forget about him.


This is Major. Sorry the photo is so blurry. He was absolutely gorgeous. I don't know if she bred him, buit I'll post some older photos in the next post which might give a clue to his origin...

jacey: (Default)

I'm not sure how we found Margaret Harvey's Wharfedale Riding School, but someone decided to start a riding club at college (Leeds School of Librarianship had been independent, but by that time was part of Leeds Polytechnic and the Student Union had fundingand a minibus). I'm sure there must have been more than just us few in the club but six out of the eight people here were library students if you include me behind the camera. Left to right: Jenny Fisher (now Downsborough); Eileen Gomersall (now Jack); Jan Booth (now Warner). On the pony (Cracker) is John French - not a librarian. Then there's Yvonne Smith (can't remember her maiden name). Kneeling is Teddi Craven (now Coutts) and back right is Pete whose surname I've forgotten. Sadly pete was killed in the seventies in a road accident in Africa. The dog is called Vandal. Location; Margaret's stable yard - a mews of tumbledown brick buildings off Station Road in Menston (between Guisely and Otley in what's now West Yorkshire, but was then the West Riding of Yorkshire. Missing from the photo are regulars Mike Heywood and Lindsey (now Lindsey Heywood). We were a mixture of riders and beginners, but everyone seemed to muddle along. Eileen later went on to train in Germany and became ferociously good.



Jan on Robin; Jacey on Dominic and Teddi on Blossom. I think this was the last day of the college riding club and we were arsing about up in the gorse field, hard hats removed for the camera.


Left: Jan on Robin. All Kestrel's offspring were instantly recognisable by their heads regardless of size of pony. I wasn't all that keen on Robin, but Jan loved him.
Right: Me on Blossom. I should be eternally grateful to her for not bucking me off at this point.


Jan on Dominic. He was a nice ride, a good all rounder and very untypical of Margaret Harvey's horses being neither obviously from the same line as Kestrel or Fell/Dales. Possibly that's why I always forget about him.


This is Major. Sorry the photo is so blurry. He was absolutely gorgeous. I don't know if she bred him, buit I'll post some older photos in the next post which might give a clue to his origin...

jacey: (Default)
A while ago i posted some photos of me and horses in the mid 1970s at Margaret Harvey's riding stables in Menston (near Otley) and [livejournal.com profile] morphlet  found them online. It turns out that she used to go to the same riding school but about 8 - 10 years later than I did. We share some horses in common and I promised to post some old photos of horses and ponies she remembers hearing about. Please bear with me while I get all nostalgic.
MetalMorphlet, this is the Metal that I knew. According to MH he was 35 when this photo was taken. He was still virtually unstoppable. Oddly enough, he was actually better with a fairly weak rider because he hated having his mouth messed with and so someone who sat still and kept their hands to themselves was safer on him than someone who tried to boss him about. He always had to be upfront, though. MH use to tell tales about this pony, many of them apocryphal, I think. Though when you saw him in action I could believe the bit about being descended from Hyperion and winning the open jumping at the Yorkshire Show in his youth! Sorry this is a very poor photo and doesn't show him off at all.

Metal's long-time stable-mate was Star. Also a great little pony, fast, a bit headstrong but he'd been a good jumping and gymkhana pony in his heyday and still wasn't a pony you could put an inexperienced rider on.

This is Tamarisk, who buggered my back by bucking me off spectacularly.

More in the next post...

 
jacey: (Default)
A while ago i posted some photos of me and horses in the mid 1970s at Margaret Harvey's riding stables in Menston (near Otley) and [livejournal.com profile] morphlet  found them online. It turns out that she used to go to the same riding school but about 8 - 10 years later than I did. We share some horses in common and I promised to post some old photos of horses and ponies she remembers hearing about. Please bear with me while I get all nostalgic.
MetalMorphlet, this is the Metal that I knew. According to MH he was 35 when this photo was taken. He was still virtually unstoppable. Oddly enough, he was actually better with a fairly weak rider because he hated having his mouth messed with and so someone who sat still and kept their hands to themselves was safer on him than someone who tried to boss him about. He always had to be upfront, though. MH use to tell tales about this pony, many of them apocryphal, I think. Though when you saw him in action I could believe the bit about being descended from Hyperion and winning the open jumping at the Yorkshire Show in his youth! Sorry this is a very poor photo and doesn't show him off at all.

Metal's long-time stable-mate was Star. Also a great little pony, fast, a bit headstrong but he'd been a good jumping and gymkhana pony in his heyday and still wasn't a pony you could put an inexperienced rider on.

This is Tamarisk, who buggered my back by bucking me off spectacularly.

More in the next post...

 
jacey: (Default)
I'm working on the first draft of 'Your Horse Sees Dead People'. Currently 45k words and should be finished in another 5k - 7k words. I'm just setting everything up to write the climax. This is the magic-and-horses book for middle-grade readers. (It may actually be borderline YA, ut I'm not worrying about that until Agent Beth has read it.) I had lots of ideas, but I'm not going to be able to get them into a book of this length so I'm thinking that there may be some mileage for other books in a series. This book features Epona. i'm thinking the next one will have a water kelpie villain and then maybe in the third, Pegasus.
jacey: (Default)
I'm working on the first draft of 'Your Horse Sees Dead People'. Currently 45k words and should be finished in another 5k - 7k words. I'm just setting everything up to write the climax. This is the magic-and-horses book for middle-grade readers. (It may actually be borderline YA, ut I'm not worrying about that until Agent Beth has read it.) I had lots of ideas, but I'm not going to be able to get them into a book of this length so I'm thinking that there may be some mileage for other books in a series. This book features Epona. i'm thinking the next one will have a water kelpie villain and then maybe in the third, Pegasus.
jacey: (Default)
Found via the excellent Bookview Cafe

jacey: (Default)
Found via the excellent Bookview Cafe

jacey: (Default)
I posted some yourtube-horseback thrills and spills a short while ago, but this is just lovely. A competent rider and a rock-steady horse delivering a sensible cross-country round. A nice understanding between horse and rider.




jacey: (Default)
I posted some yourtube-horseback thrills and spills a short while ago, but this is just lovely. A competent rider and a rock-steady horse delivering a sensible cross-country round. A nice understanding between horse and rider.




jacey: (Default)
I need to stop looking at horses on youtube and get back to NaNoWriMo, but before I do... this is what happens when it doesn't quite go according to plan but luck is with you anyway...




jacey: (Default)
I need to stop looking at horses on youtube and get back to NaNoWriMo, but before I do... this is what happens when it doesn't quite go according to plan but luck is with you anyway...




jacey: (Default)
Switzerland's Willi Melliger jumping the Puissance Wall on Airport Moet - bareback.
Wow!



jacey: (Default)
Switzerland's Willi Melliger jumping the Puissance Wall on Airport Moet - bareback.
Wow!



jacey: (Default)
...and others who like pretty horses:



jacey: (Default)
...and others who like pretty horses:



jacey: (Default)
[personal profile] green_knight just gave us a fabulous dog-dressage video. Here's a perfect horse one:

jacey: (Default)
[personal profile] green_knight just gave us a fabulous dog-dressage video. Here's a perfect horse one:

jacey: (Jacey)
The Other Prince. Champion Mountain & moorland, Weatherby Show curca 1773I'm still rummaging through my photographs . [personal profile] heleninwales set me thinking about horses last week and [personal profile] mevennen continued the theme this week with her farrier post.

After posting a photo pf Prince, the first pony I rode back in 1956 I came across a photo of the other Prince, winning the Mountain & Moorland Championship at Weatherby Show in (around) 1973). This was taken with his owner, Margaret Harvey, pretty much an unforgettable character in her own right.

Margaret had been a debutante in her youth but when I knew her was a typical tweedy horsewoman with a booming voice, two golden retrievers and a stack of bills she tried to ignore.

She had a lot of equines, a few of them really good ones, including Prince, a Fell Pony gelding, and a really nice Dales pony mare called Bussy. (That's me and Bussy - right - at the Great Yorkshire Show in about 1973) Jacey and Bussy at the Great Yorkshire ShowMargaret bred two or three foals a year, mostly from her thoroughbred/appaloosa stallion Kestrel. I think the riding school was just an excuse to let her keep all her horses. She loved them all.

We discovered her riding school in Menston when I joined the college riding club. I ended up on the rota more often than most because having passed my driving test at age 17, I was one of the few people at college who could drive the minibus legally. (Note I didn't say safely as I never could reverse the damn thing on wing mirrors.)

Jacey and Eileen in Menston 1975Even after leaving college and getting married i continued to drive up to Menston to ride at Margaret's because i still had friends there. This is me and Eileen Gomersall (Now Eileen Jack.)

Damn me but after saying I never forgot a horse's name, I can't remember the name of the brown hunter I'm riding. He was 16.2 and a very decent ride. Eileen is on Kestrel, the stud stallion. He could be a bit evil on the ground, but was a fantastic ride if you weren't scared of him.

This was the summer of 1975 and I remember the day so clearly because we'd just come back from taking a party of kids (Best Beloved's school) to Belgium and the night we got back I was given the news that my grandma had got terminal cancer. This was the first time I'd been threatened with losing a loved one to a long slow illness and life was suddenly about to get very weird.

So this was the calm before the storm.

A couple of days after getting the news I went to Menston for - probably - the last time. I'd got my arms sunburned on the ferry home and it was another scorching day, so Eileen is wearing my T Shirt and I'm wearing her long sleeved shirt to keep the sun off.

Grandma Bennett. Annie bennett, 1900 -1975Annie Bennett. 1900 - 1975.
My maternal grandmother.
When this photo was taken she was the same age as I am now.
That's scary!
jacey: (Jacey)
The Other Prince. Champion Mountain & moorland, Weatherby Show curca 1773I'm still rummaging through my photographs . [personal profile] heleninwales set me thinking about horses last week and [personal profile] mevennen continued the theme this week with her farrier post.

After posting a photo pf Prince, the first pony I rode back in 1956 I came across a photo of the other Prince, winning the Mountain & Moorland Championship at Weatherby Show in (around) 1973). This was taken with his owner, Margaret Harvey, pretty much an unforgettable character in her own right.

Margaret had been a debutante in her youth but when I knew her was a typical tweedy horsewoman with a booming voice, two golden retrievers and a stack of bills she tried to ignore.

She had a lot of equines, a few of them really good ones, including Prince, a Fell Pony gelding, and a really nice Dales pony mare called Bussy. (That's me and Bussy - right - at the Great Yorkshire Show in about 1973) Jacey and Bussy at the Great Yorkshire ShowMargaret bred two or three foals a year, mostly from her thoroughbred/appaloosa stallion Kestrel. I think the riding school was just an excuse to let her keep all her horses. She loved them all.

We discovered her riding school in Menston when I joined the college riding club. I ended up on the rota more often than most because having passed my driving test at age 17, I was one of the few people at college who could drive the minibus legally. (Note I didn't say safely as I never could reverse the damn thing on wing mirrors.)

Jacey and Eileen in Menston 1975Even after leaving college and getting married i continued to drive up to Menston to ride at Margaret's because i still had friends there. This is me and Eileen Gomersall (Now Eileen Jack.)

Damn me but after saying I never forgot a horse's name, I can't remember the name of the brown hunter I'm riding. He was 16.2 and a very decent ride. Eileen is on Kestrel, the stud stallion. He could be a bit evil on the ground, but was a fantastic ride if you weren't scared of him.

This was the summer of 1975 and I remember the day so clearly because we'd just come back from taking a party of kids (Best Beloved's school) to Belgium and the night we got back I was given the news that my grandma had got terminal cancer. This was the first time I'd been threatened with losing a loved one to a long slow illness and life was suddenly about to get very weird.

So this was the calm before the storm.

A couple of days after getting the news I went to Menston for - probably - the last time. I'd got my arms sunburned on the ferry home and it was another scorching day, so Eileen is wearing my T Shirt and I'm wearing her long sleeved shirt to keep the sun off.

Grandma Bennett. Annie bennett, 1900 -1975Annie Bennett. 1900 - 1975.
My maternal grandmother.
When this photo was taken she was the same age as I am now.
That's scary!
jacey: (schoolpic)
So [personal profile] heleninwales and the pony photographs set me thinking...

Funny how much detail you remember, isn't it? I was (almost) seven in 1957. My parents had scrimped and saved to buy me six riding lessons for my birthday (no mean feat because they really didn't have much money in those days.) The lessons cost 7/6 (old money) which was a lot in 1957. I can distinctly remember the butterflies in my tummy being driven down to the stables for the first lesson with my friend, Janet, who was almost 2 years older than me. I remember the clean dung/hay smell of the stable yard, breathing it in and feeling 'right'. (And Janet's Dad laughing at me when I sniffed appreciatively and said, Smell that'.) I can't remember getting on the pony (Prince), a 12.2 hand bright bay, but I can remember being led out of the yard and up the hill by the side of Locke Park (Barnsley), Janet and I on a lead rein, one on each side of the instructor. Janet was on a pony called Mandy, another bright bay, which was a bit bigger than Prince (maybe 13.1) and which I ended up riding most of the rest of that course of lessons.

I remember trotting for the first time and trying to post because I'd read about rising in your stirrups. The instructor said I was getting it but it felt awkward and then I slipped into the rhythm and 'got' it, but for some reason Janet didn't and I felt smug because Janet usually did everything better than me.

Those six lessons were all my parents could afford until the next summer; another birthday and another six lessons. And so on until I was ten and that stable closed (it's a country house restaurant now) and we found a cheaper, scruffier more DIY one and I started to go more regularly and get my hands dirty.
Jacey with Brigadoon
The pic is me with a horse called Brigadoon at the scruffy stables. I guess I'm about eleven and I'd started volunteering to saddle up and muck out in return for getting to ride the horses down to the field bareback.

By the way, yes I am entering for the worst jodhpurs competition. In those days there was no stretch fabric and johds were corduroy with the big 'bag' from hip to knee to allow for movement...except they didn't because there was still no vertical stretch in them. I hated those johds with a passion.

A year or two later and I'd moved on to a better stable, started to do even more work and managed to get quite a few free rides in addition to my one paid-for ride a week. The ponies in the pic to the right are Chess,  Arab and dangerously evil tempered; Tommy then aged 35; Biddy, a Welsh-Connemara cross and my favourite; Mealy, the Exmoor who is personally responsible for my lumpy leg (soft tissue damage from a fall and kick) and Teal a placid but sweet bay cob that I had a real soft spot for.The ponies at Gransden Riding School, Royston

I'd probably have been riding there still... but the council put a compulsory purchase order on the home paddock to build a new school and so the stable closed and by that time I was starting A-Levels and already hooked up with Best Beloved (yes really, still the same Best Beloved) so riding became more sporadic. Though I did teach Best Beloved to ride and we continued riding into our twenties until babies and life got in the way.

Never did get my own pony. Best Beloved still fancies a pony and trap, but as he's just converted the barn and stable block we no longer have a ready made stable. I like those sit-and-ride chariot thingies that [personal profile] green_knightfound last week. Maybe one of those and a donkey. That'd be cute. I love donkeys.
jacey: (schoolpic)
So [personal profile] heleninwales and the pony photographs set me thinking...

Funny how much detail you remember, isn't it? I was (almost) seven in 1957. My parents had scrimped and saved to buy me six riding lessons for my birthday (no mean feat because they really didn't have much money in those days.) The lessons cost 7/6 (old money) which was a lot in 1957. I can distinctly remember the butterflies in my tummy being driven down to the stables for the first lesson with my friend, Janet, who was almost 2 years older than me. I remember the clean dung/hay smell of the stable yard, breathing it in and feeling 'right'. (And Janet's Dad laughing at me when I sniffed appreciatively and said, Smell that'.) I can't remember getting on the pony (Prince), a 12.2 hand bright bay, but I can remember being led out of the yard and up the hill by the side of Locke Park (Barnsley), Janet and I on a lead rein, one on each side of the instructor. Janet was on a pony called Mandy, another bright bay, which was a bit bigger than Prince (maybe 13.1) and which I ended up riding most of the rest of that course of lessons.

I remember trotting for the first time and trying to post because I'd read about rising in your stirrups. The instructor said I was getting it but it felt awkward and then I slipped into the rhythm and 'got' it, but for some reason Janet didn't and I felt smug because Janet usually did everything better than me.

Those six lessons were all my parents could afford until the next summer; another birthday and another six lessons. And so on until I was ten and that stable closed (it's a country house restaurant now) and we found a cheaper, scruffier more DIY one and I started to go more regularly and get my hands dirty.
Jacey with Brigadoon
The pic is me with a horse called Brigadoon at the scruffy stables. I guess I'm about eleven and I'd started volunteering to saddle up and muck out in return for getting to ride the horses down to the field bareback.

By the way, yes I am entering for the worst jodhpurs competition. In those days there was no stretch fabric and johds were corduroy with the big 'bag' from hip to knee to allow for movement...except they didn't because there was still no vertical stretch in them. I hated those johds with a passion.

A year or two later and I'd moved on to a better stable, started to do even more work and managed to get quite a few free rides in addition to my one paid-for ride a week. The ponies in the pic to the right are Chess,  Arab and dangerously evil tempered; Tommy then aged 35; Biddy, a Welsh-Connemara cross and my favourite; Mealy, the Exmoor who is personally responsible for my lumpy leg (soft tissue damage from a fall and kick) and Teal a placid but sweet bay cob that I had a real soft spot for.The ponies at Gransden Riding School, Royston

I'd probably have been riding there still... but the council put a compulsory purchase order on the home paddock to build a new school and so the stable closed and by that time I was starting A-Levels and already hooked up with Best Beloved (yes really, still the same Best Beloved) so riding became more sporadic. Though I did teach Best Beloved to ride and we continued riding into our twenties until babies and life got in the way.

Never did get my own pony. Best Beloved still fancies a pony and trap, but as he's just converted the barn and stable block we no longer have a ready made stable. I like those sit-and-ride chariot thingies that [personal profile] green_knightfound last week. Maybe one of those and a donkey. That'd be cute. I love donkeys.
jacey: (Default)
[personal profile] heleninwales reminded me about some of the horses i used to ride when I was a kid. This was my first riding lesson  - age 7 -on a pony called Prince. There are a few more old horse photos in my gallery. Feel free to take a look






Jacey on Prince Jacey on Prince

My first riding lesson Summer 1957. Keresforth Hall Stables, just behind Locke Park, Barnsley.


jacey: (Default)
[personal profile] heleninwales reminded me about some of the horses i used to ride when I was a kid. This was my first riding lesson  - age 7 -on a pony called Prince. There are a few more old horse photos in my gallery. Feel free to take a look






Jacey on Prince Jacey on Prince

My first riding lesson Summer 1957. Keresforth Hall Stables, just behind Locke Park, Barnsley.


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