jacey: (Default)

Nimbus by Jacey Bedford - book coverSaveDAW sent me the cover for the next book. Nimbus, due out in October. The cover artist is Stephan Martiniere, who did the covers for both Empire of Dust and Crossways.

This is the last of the Psi-Tech trilogy featuring Cara Carlinni and Reska 'Ben' Benjamin as they continue to fight the corrupt megacorporations. However, something is stirring in the depths of foldspace which might bring a dramatic change to spacefaring humankind.
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jacey: (blue eyes)
IMG_20160925_090611849Fantasycon-by-the-Sea in late September was... interesting. It was held at the Grand Hotel, Scarborough, which is undoubtedly no longer grand, though it is big.

It remains the most writerly of cons with most panels aimed at writers and peopled by writers and industry professionals. Its progamme is hard to fault and there are lots of book launches and plenty of freebie books. (I scored Adrian Tchaikovsky's Guns of the Dawn, Naomi Novik's Uprooted and Helen Keen's The Science of Game of Thrones.) I signed up for a couple of excellent small events, including the Scott Lynch and Elizabeth Bear one on being a writer.

The panel rooms were a good size (some of them in the Grand's sister hotel just round the corner) and there was always social seating available in at least one of the bars. The Grand Hotel was actually a perfect setting for a horror con, but it worked for fantasy, too. 365 rooms, 12 floors, four turrets for days of the year/months/seasons. It's Victorian Gothick or possibly Victorian Grotesque. (Just check out the brickwork in the photo.) It must have been very grand in its heyday, but now it's being milked by Pontins. The maximum profit for the minimum amount of renovation/upkeep seems to be the way of things, so there are patches of damp plaster, broken toilets, lifts that don't work (and when they do you kind of wish you weren't trusting your life to them). The lounge bar which still has glorious ornamental plaster pillars similar to the ones in the Brighton Pavilion now has a row of fruit machines, and the corridor leading to the dealer rooms was jam-packed with re-charging mobility scooters.


IMG_20160923_140643448But the staff were unfailingly pleasant and you can't beat it for value for money. The basic room-share cost £40 per person per night for bed, breakfast and evening meal. I'm surprised they can function at all at that price. We paid an extra tenner per person per night for a sea-view room and a place in the 'posh' dining room. (Same food but no gueues.) That was a good move. Our room was tired, but functional and clean, and the view over South Bay was magnificent. Bonus was an enormous 'afternoon tea' at the Grand. It was so big we didn't know whether to eat it or ride it. I don't normally take photos of food but this had to be an exception.
jacey: (blue eyes)
What an experience.  Upwards of eight thousand people in London's Excel Centre (out beyond Docklands) experiencing SFF overload for five days with panels, costumes, exhibits and retail therapy. Famous names and infamous ones. And a lot of people having fun.

Excel is cavernous and impersonal but the Con Committee had done their best to humanise the Fan Village with gazebos and designated areas for kids, quiet reading, bar, enquiries, societies and all the con bids for future years - most of them offering freebies, food, drink and parties to swing the vote their way.

There was also plenty of extra seating space on the concourse, a kind of elongated food court that was also the through way from Excel East to Excel West - a half-mile hike which felt twice that long. Excel is so huge you can catch a DLR train from one end to the other. I walked my feet off.

The programme was great and I did see some panels, but not as many as I had marked in my book. Sadly some were oversubscribed and the security crew (hired in by Excel) were hot on kicking out anyone who hadn't got a chair - in some cases interrupting panely that had already started with little in the way of tact. Some panels didn't quite end up being what they were supposed to be (the post colonialism one missed its mark by not extrapolating into the future, or talking in general terms about how to write post colonialism, and seemed to take an hour to tell us which current countries were post-colonial), but some were excellent. Full marks to the one on swearing in SF. Great laugh! I did three panerls and no one threw rotten tomatoes, so they seemed to go down well.

Lovely to meet Ann Leckie at the SFWA reception. I'm delighted Ancilliary Justice got the Hugo. Well deserved.

rasfc meet1024x764There were lots of Milford people there, regulars and new ones, and a gathering of people I knew from the usenet newsgroup, r.a.sf.c (rec.arts.science fiction.composition) consisting of people I'd met before and some I knew only from the net from as far afield as Germany, France, the USA and Alaska (yes, I know that's the USA as well!). Great to be goven a signed copy of Bill Swears' book Zook Country. Thanks, Bill.

I got whisked off to dinner twice by my editor, Sheila Gilbert, once to a small gathering and once to the official DAW dinner with Sheila and Betsy plus Seanan McGuire, Michelle Sagara West, Tanya Huff, Fiona Patton, Kari Sperring, Ben Aaronovitch, various partners and DAW's British agent. A delightful gathering at the Gun, a historic riverside pub in the Docklands area with a private dining room on the riverside opposite the Dome. Highly recommended.
jacey: (blue eyes)
If I've been quiet on LJ lately it's because I'm now 70,000 words into the first draft of Crossways, the sequel to Empire of Dust (which comes out in November from DAW) and another Psi-tech novel. My three book deal is for two psi-tech novels and a completely unrelated historical fantasy, but the deeper I get into Crossways the more I'm thinking that this will not be the end of the Psi-Tech universe.

The hook line for Crossways is: 'What begins as a search for survivors becomes a battle for survival.'

I can't explain too much of the plot without spoilers for Empire, but things barely alluded to in Empire come to the fore in Crossways, including the nature of 'jumpgate travel' and what lies in wait for the unwary in foldspace. My characters have undergone a radical change in their lives and now must become independent of the corporate empire which spawned them. As always happens in any amorphous bunch of people, some go their own way and others rise to the surface. Some take a bit of a break in this book, but are already crying out for a book of their own. Some character seeds sown in Empire are starting to flower Crossways and (to continue the gardening theme) others are almost ready for pruning.

My delivery date is August, so I need to achieve about 10,000 words a week to complete my first draft by the end of July and give myself a little time for basic revision before i send it off to my editor. That's do-able.

I'm having fun.
jacey: (blue eyes)

Looks like I’m going to have a busy morning on Saturday at Loncon3 in August. I get to spout guff about Doctor Whoish goodness and Red Wedding gore. And then sit on a panel with: an agent who rejected me, and an agent who made me an offer but whom I turned down (with much heart-searching) in favour of my present agent Amy Boggs of Donald Maass. Should be fun.

2014 Hugos: Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

Saturday 11:00 – 12:00

The nominees for this year’s Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation: Short Form, are:


  • An Adventure in Space and Time written by Mark Gatiss, directed by Terry McDonough (BBC Television)

  • Doctor Who: “The Day of the Doctor” written by Steven Moffat, directed by Nick Hurran (BBC Television)

  • Doctor Who: “The Name of the Doctor” written by Steven Moffat, directed by Saul Metzstein (BBC Televison)

  • The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot written & directed by Peter Davison (BBC Television)

  • Game of Thrones: “The Rains of Castamere” written by David Benioff & D.B. Weiss, directed by David Nutter (HBO Entertainment in association with Bighead, Littlehead; Television 360; Startling Television and Generator Productions)

  • Orphan Black: “Variations under Domestication” written by Will Pascoe, directed by John Fawcett (Temple Street Productions; Space / BBC America)

But which should win? Our panel will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the nominees, try to second-guess the voters, and tell you what else should have been on the ballot.

With: Ashley Pollard Ms. (M) , Iain Clark , Jacey Bedford, Abigail Brady, Saxon Bullock.

Finding an Agent

Saturday 12:00 – 13:30

A great query letter is all you need! Write a great manuscript and the rest doesn’t matter! Network at conventions and you’re in good shape! These nuggets of advice and dozens like them float around the writersphere as gospel. How many of these have a ring of truth? What is the secret to finding an agent? And what does an agent do once you have one? Our agents will decrypt the process.

With: Betsy Mitchell (M), Jacey Bedford, Joshua Bilmes, Ian Drury, John Jarrold

jacey: (blue eyes)
It's official and I can now announce it. I've got a three book deal with DAW in the USA (part of the Penguin group). Two novels wiill be SF and the third is my magic pirate fantasy. Two of them have been written already and one is for delivery by August 2014. I am thrilled! DAW is my dream publisher. Thank you to Sheila Gilbert, my new editor, and Amy Boggs of Donald Maass, my agent.

And thanks for Kari Sperring for the intro to DAW and to Kari (again), Charlie Allery, Tina Anghelatos and Jaine Fenn for holding my hand (or rather listening to me burble) through the getting an agent process.

I love overnight success. It's only taken me 15 years to achieve!
:-)
jacey: (blue eyes)
Andromeda One is a one-day SF, fantasy and horror convention taking place on Saturday 21st September 2013 from 11am to 22:00pm with Dealer's Room open at 09:00am and early bird kaffeeklatches from 08:30am.

Taking place at the Custard Factory in Birmingham, it brings together a host of science-fiction, fantasy and horror writers and publishers for a day loaded with book launches, kaffeeklatches, panels, signings, writing and publishing workshops and much more.

There will be a stream dedicated to workshops on gender parity and multiculturalism  and disabilities in the SFF/Horror community

Single Tickets are £25 each; Group Tickets (for up to five people) are £100. Prices held until 9th August 2013.
Prices go up 10th August 2013 to £27.00 or Group ticket £110.00

GUESTS OF HONOUR include Paul Cornell and Jaine Fenn.
Plus sessions with an impressive range of speakers: Chris Amies, Jacey Bedford, Misa Buckley (SFR) Mike Chinn, Theresa Derwin, Jan Edwards (Alchemy Press & Editor/Writer) Janet Edwards SF Writer, Simon Marshall-Jones of Spectral Press, Adrian Middleton, Stan Nicholls & Anne Gay/Nicholls, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Mark West and Ian Whates.

Book your tickets now at http://terror-tree.co.uk/andromeda-one/

Story Sales

Apr. 3rd, 2013 09:30 pm
jacey: (blue eyes)
I just sold two stories to upcoming anthologies:
'Absolution Pass' to Andromeda's Offspring (due out in May) and 'Kindling the Flame' to Her Dark Voice' (due out in September.)
:-)
Many thanks to Jaine Fenn for the introduction to Theresa Derwin, who is editing both.
:-)
Wheeee!
jacey: (blue eyes)
I had a lovely time at Eastercon in Bradford this weekend. A big congratulations and thank you to all the organisers and volunteers, plus kudos to the hotel staff for being unfailingly helpful and friendly. I ended up on two extra panels so I had a busy Friday moderating the Zulu Culture panel, taking part in the Characterisation panel and then MC-ing the Zulu Tradition concert. The Zulus had a whale of a time and stuck around afterwards to continue answering questions as long as peorple wanted to ask them. They gave excellent value in the Culture panel introducing it with a song and a small dramatisation to illustrate the work of a Sangoma (traditional healer) and then talking about historical and present day aspects. It was a perfect example of how and ancient and modern culture can exist side by side, curled around each other like puppies in a basket. The Zulu concert was hugely energetic and, judging by the queue to buy CDs in the interval, extremely well received.

I always love the opportunity to babble on about writing and books, so the Character panel was probably my favourite of the weekend, but I was asked to do a couple of panels on Sunday, one on Alan Garner (a favourite of mine from my childhood) and the other on Cityscapes, which I didn't think I knew much about, but it turns out I had plenty to say.

And the other lovely aspect of Eastercon was seeing friends: I travelled up with Jaine Fenn and her husband Dave Weddell who had stayed over with us on Thursday night. I'd arranged to meet up with Charlie Allery, Tina Anghelatos, Sue Thomason (my room-mate) and John Moran - all writers I've known for many years from Milford and from the r.a.sf.c usenet newsgroup, with John's wife Sara, a proto writer working hard at her craft. We planted ourselves firmly in the corner of the bar, becoming adept at maintaining a space even with various people coming and going were several other writers who have attended Milford over the years, including Chris Butler whose novella, 'Flight of the Ravens' was shortlisted for a BSFA award (which sadly he did not win, but the nomination alone was great recognition). Well done, Chris.

I'm already booked for World Fantasy Con in Brighton in October/November 2013, Eastercon 2014 in Glasgow and the London Worldcon in August 2014. Looking forward to future events and meeting up again with good friends. I've only been going to SF cons for a few years, but I'm hooked.
jacey: (Default)
Just back from Eastercon held this year at Heathrow and featuring guests George R R Martin and Paul Cornell, amongst others. Lovely to see so many friends. Mentioning everyone by name would be next to impossible, but I flew down from Manchester with John and Sara Moran and arranged to meet up with [livejournal.com profile] charlieallery, [livejournal.com profile] tina_anghelatos and [livejournal.com profile] heleninwales (and despite the weirdgeography of the hotel actually managed to do that).

[livejournal.com profile] mevennen was there with the lovely T and their Witchcraft Shop stall in the dealers room and I ran into no end of writers I know from Milford, some of whom I haven't seen for a few years.

Panels were great, with many interesting ones on various aspects of books/writing/publishing. Special kudos to Joe Abercrombie who, despite his books being dark, gritty and full of entrails, proved to be a funny and charming panellist and not at all inclined to wield edged weapons. One of the best panels of the whole weekend was 'There's a hole in my plot' which, despite Joe Abercrombie bouncing laughs off the rest of the panellists for the whole fifty minutes, still managed to deliver some useful insights about plotting.

George R.R. Martin and Paul Cornell were both hugely entertaining and seemed like jolly nice chaps.

I volunteered for panels this year - first time ever - and was pleased to be invited to sit on a panel called 'How pseudo do you like your Medieval?' A nice little session (I thought) discussing the use of historical periods as a setting for your fantasy book. I didn't find out who the other panellists were until a bare couple of weeks beforehand: George R R Martin, Juliet McKenna, Anne Lyle and Anne C Perry (moderator). And instead of being in a little room it was on the main stage in the big Commonwealth auditorium with cameras and a video screen (and also streamed live over the net) and a full audience of several hundred. I have to say that Anne C Perry did an amazing job of moderating it. Everyone got a fair turn and the questions kept us all right on track. I managed to get a couple of laughs and a ripple of applause which was very gratifying. I must have said something pertinent, though for the life of me I can't remember what. I don't think it was recorded, but if anyone finds it on youtube, please let me know.

The Easterecon committee did a fabulous job or orgaising and delivered four days of excellent programming. The only thing that let the con down was the hotel, or aspects of it. The rooms were fine and the beds comfortable, so I could forgive almost everything else, however there wasn't enough social space (apparently one of their bars was out of action) and the available spaces (the Bijou Bar or the Atrium) were extremely noisy. The Bijou Bar having thump-thump music which increased in volume as the night progressed and the Atrium being a huge open space with acoustics like a swimming pool and very little seating. The con food - which was very reasonably priced at a tenner for two courses - offered no choice of menu, do if you didn't happen to like beef stroganoff served with minted potatoes, you were left with the restaurant at between £13 and £22 for a main course or Bijou Bar prices at £11.50 for a burger. One thing which did rankle in the Bijou Bar was £7.50 plus a service charge for one cappucino and one half-full cups of coffee which took fifteen minutes to make. I do appreciate that there are a limited number of hotels big enough to take a convention of 1400 people, so I have no problems with the committee's choice of venue.

What I have decided is that after a somewhat shaky and bemused start at the rescue con at Chester a few years ago, where I felt totally out of my depth, I like Eastercon and will be signing up annually. Birmingham last year was hugely enjoyable and Heathrow this year has clnched it. [info]la_marquise_de_ is one of the organising committee who recently got the go-ahead for Eastercon 2013 in Bradford, so I've paid up for that. I'm told that the hotel is lovely and very welcoming to Eastercon, and it has the advantage of being close to home. Already looking forward to it.
jacey: (Default)
Just back from Eastercon held this year at Heathrow and featuring guests George R R Martin and Paul Cornell, amongst others. Lovely to see so many friends. Mentioning everyone by name would be next to impossible, but I flew down from Manchester with John and Sara Moran and arranged to meet up with [livejournal.com profile] charlieallery, [livejournal.com profile] tina_anghelatos and [livejournal.com profile] heleninwales (and despite the weirdgeography of the hotel actually managed to do that).

[livejournal.com profile] mevennen was there with the lovely T and their Witchcraft Shop stall in the dealers room and I ran into no end of writers I know from Milford, some of whom I haven't seen for a few years.

Panels were great, with many interesting ones on various aspects of books/writing/publishing. Special kudos to Joe Abercrombie who, despite his books being dark, gritty and full of entrails, proved to be a funny and charming panellist and not at all inclined to wield edged weapons. One of the best panels of the whole weekend was 'There's a hole in my plot' which, despite Joe Abercrombie bouncing laughs off the rest of the panellists for the whole fifty minutes, still managed to deliver some useful insights about plotting.

George R.R. Martin and Paul Cornell were both hugely entertaining and seemed like jolly nice chaps.

I volunteered for panels this year - first time ever - and was pleased to be invited to sit on a panel called 'How pseudo do you like your Medieval?' A nice little session (I thought) discussing the use of historical periods as a setting for your fantasy book. I didn't find out who the other panellists were until a bare couple of weeks beforehand: George R R Martin, Juliet McKenna, Anne Lyle and Anne C Perry (moderator). And instead of being in a little room it was on the main stage in the big Commonwealth auditorium with cameras and a video screen (and also streamed live over the net) and a full audience of several hundred. I have to say that Anne C Perry did an amazing job of moderating it. Everyone got a fair turn and the questions kept us all right on track. I managed to get a couple of laughs and a ripple of applause which was very gratifying. I must have said something pertinent, though for the life of me I can't remember what. I don't think it was recorded, but if anyone finds it on youtube, please let me know.

The Easterecon committee did a fabulous job or orgaising and delivered four days of excellent programming. The only thing that let the con down was the hotel, or aspects of it. The rooms were fine and the beds comfortable, so I could forgive almost everything else, however there wasn't enough social space (apparently one of their bars was out of action) and the available spaces (the Bijou Bar or the Atrium) were extremely noisy. The Bijou Bar having thump-thump music which increased in volume as the night progressed and the Atrium being a huge open space with acoustics like a swimming pool and very little seating. The con food - which was very reasonably priced at a tenner for two courses - offered no choice of menu, do if you didn't happen to like beef stroganoff served with minted potatoes, you were left with the restaurant at between £13 and £22 for a main course or Bijou Bar prices at £11.50 for a burger. One thing which did rankle in the Bijou Bar was £7.50 plus a service charge for one cappucino and one half-full cups of coffee which took fifteen minutes to make. I do appreciate that there are a limited number of hotels big enough to take a convention of 1400 people, so I have no problems with the committee's choice of venue.

What I have decided is that after a somewhat shaky and bemused start at the rescue con at Chester a few years ago, where I felt totally out of my depth, I like Eastercon and will be signing up annually. Birmingham last year was hugely enjoyable and Heathrow this year has clnched it. [info]la_marquise_de_ is one of the organising committee who recently got the go-ahead for Eastercon 2013 in Bradford, so I've paid up for that. I'm told that the hotel is lovely and very welcoming to Eastercon, and it has the advantage of being close to home. Already looking forward to it.

SF TV

Sep. 17th, 2009 12:13 am
jacey: (Default)
I just looked in Radio Times and spotted the return of Merlin to Saturday night TV schedules. (BBC). The jury's still out on this, but it's marginally better than Robin the Hoodie though probably not quite as good as Primeval. None of them, of course, are a patch on Doctor Who or Torchwood, however. Of course, SF telly has been so grim over the summer that even the return of Merlin is quite a bright spot.

I just bought The Dresden Files on DVD to try it - though I haven't watched yet, so I'll let you know. I tried Moonlight, but I thought it a poor version of Angel. (Vamp detective.) Even Sophia Miles (so good in Girl in the Fireplace - Doctor Who Season 3) couldn't really save it. 

I never saw the last couple of seasons (9 and 10) of Stargate SG 1 so I bought the sets when they came on cheap offer because I like Claudia Black and Ben Browder (Farscape). They did add a bit of life to an old and well-tried concept and were certainly worth watching, though call me cynical, but the casting office seems to have drawn in all the regulars from a host of SF series with Lexia Doig from Andromeda and (name forgotten) the Doctor from Voyager. I may have missed a fair amount of seasons 7 and 8, but it was easy enough to pick up the threads again. I probably need to get Continuum to finish off my Stargate watching. Not sure I can ever afford Stargate Atlantis as I've missed all of it, but I might watch out for Stargate Universe.

Looking forward to Lost. I won't get to see Season Five until the DVD set arrives.

SF TV

Sep. 17th, 2009 12:13 am
jacey: (Default)
I just looked in Radio Times and spotted the return of Merlin to Saturday night TV schedules. (BBC). The jury's still out on this, but it's marginally better than Robin the Hoodie though probably not quite as good as Primeval. None of them, of course, are a patch on Doctor Who or Torchwood, however. Of course, SF telly has been so grim over the summer that even the return of Merlin is quite a bright spot.

I just bought The Dresden Files on DVD to try it - though I haven't watched yet, so I'll let you know. I tried Moonlight, but I thought it a poor version of Angel. (Vamp detective.) Even Sophia Miles (so good in Girl in the Fireplace - Doctor Who Season 3) couldn't really save it. 

I never saw the last couple of seasons (9 and 10) of Stargate SG 1 so I bought the sets when they came on cheap offer because I like Claudia Black and Ben Browder (Farscape). They did add a bit of life to an old and well-tried concept and were certainly worth watching, though call me cynical, but the casting office seems to have drawn in all the regulars from a host of SF series with Lexia Doig from Andromeda and (name forgotten) the Doctor from Voyager. I may have missed a fair amount of seasons 7 and 8, but it was easy enough to pick up the threads again. I probably need to get Continuum to finish off my Stargate watching. Not sure I can ever afford Stargate Atlantis as I've missed all of it, but I might watch out for Stargate Universe.

Looking forward to Lost. I won't get to see Season Five until the DVD set arrives.
jacey: (Default)
The future is closer than you think.



jacey: (Default)
The future is closer than you think.



jacey: (Default)
I'd like to say that I'm me but apparently I'm not:


I am:
Isaac Asimov
One of the most prolific writers in history, on any imaginable subject. Cared little for art but created lasting and memorable tales.


Which science fiction writer are you?




jacey: (Default)
I'd like to say that I'm me but apparently I'm not:


I am:
Isaac Asimov
One of the most prolific writers in history, on any imaginable subject. Cared little for art but created lasting and memorable tales.


Which science fiction writer are you?




jacey: (Default)
I promised myself I would clear some of the backlog of work from my desk over the weekend, but Monday has come and gone and the mounds of paper are still there.

I know how long I've had something by its position in the strata on my desktop. The longer I've had it, the deeper it's embedded in the layers. I regret to say that there's still a pile from the Prechristmas Era to be dealt with.

Those of you on r.a.sf.c. will be familiar with the term 'cat vacuuming'... It's what you do when you find something, anything, to do so you can pretend to be too busy to get on with stuff you really don't want to do. On r.a.sf.c. it's usually used in terms of cat vacuuming to save you from writing. In my case the cat vacuuming is just saving me from piles of paper. I'd be happy to write if I didn't feel guilty about the archaeology on my desk.

Today my cat vacuuming actually took the form of transferring old TNG Star Trek videos to DVD (has to be done in real time). I intended to set the machine going and put my timer on for 40 minutes... but I ended up watching the double episode 'Encounter at Farpoint', the first TNG story. I was struck by how stiff the actors were in those early days and how terribly obvious the intended sexual-attraction storylines were flagged up between Crusher and Picard and Troy and Ryker. Their overdone looks of longing were almost pantomime in style, especially Troy and Ryker.

She loves you. Oh no she doesn't. Oh yes she does.
jacey: (Default)
I promised myself I would clear some of the backlog of work from my desk over the weekend, but Monday has come and gone and the mounds of paper are still there.

I know how long I've had something by its position in the strata on my desktop. The longer I've had it, the deeper it's embedded in the layers. I regret to say that there's still a pile from the Prechristmas Era to be dealt with.

Those of you on r.a.sf.c. will be familiar with the term 'cat vacuuming'... It's what you do when you find something, anything, to do so you can pretend to be too busy to get on with stuff you really don't want to do. On r.a.sf.c. it's usually used in terms of cat vacuuming to save you from writing. In my case the cat vacuuming is just saving me from piles of paper. I'd be happy to write if I didn't feel guilty about the archaeology on my desk.

Today my cat vacuuming actually took the form of transferring old TNG Star Trek videos to DVD (has to be done in real time). I intended to set the machine going and put my timer on for 40 minutes... but I ended up watching the double episode 'Encounter at Farpoint', the first TNG story. I was struck by how stiff the actors were in those early days and how terribly obvious the intended sexual-attraction storylines were flagged up between Crusher and Picard and Troy and Ryker. Their overdone looks of longing were almost pantomime in style, especially Troy and Ryker.

She loves you. Oh no she doesn't. Oh yes she does.

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